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JenPen

Can You "see Celiac" Via Endoscopy?

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Hello-

I'd like to let everyone know that I have really appreciated all the info I have found so far in this forum. Thanks to everyone for all the help you give to the members here!

Some background on my questions:

I had an endoscopy on Monday. My husband and I were told that the doctor saw "slightly flattened villi" and that this looked like Celiac Disease. When the biopsy results came in yesterday, we were told the bowel biopsies were normal so it is not Celiac. Instead they said the stomach biopsies showed reactive gastropathy. When I asked the nurse about what the doctor originally told me, I couldn't get a straight answer. My questions are this:

1) Is it possible to "see" flattened villi via endoscopy?

2) If it wasn't damage, then what WAS the doctor seeing?

3) Has anyone else had this happen?

4) Could the stomach "irritation" aka gastropathy, be caused by gluten? I'd rather not take the drugs they prescribed for it if I don't have to

If it helps, here is a little background:

About January I started having diarrhea, abdominal pain, "bubbly intestines" etc and began waking up multiple times every night. I was tired all the time and sometimes weak

The beginning of April I tested negative for TTG IgA and my total IgA was normal. No other Celiac tests were performed

My brother had high TTG IgA scores and an inconclusive biopsy so has not been diagnosed as Celiac. He has been on a gluten-free diet for about a year and a half and the response has been incredible

I received my Enterolab results today (didn't think the GI doc was going to do an endoscopy):

21 Antigliadin IgA

20 Antitissue Transglutminase IgA

HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Thanks in advance 8^)

Jennifer

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Guest j_mommy

Endo's are the gold standard for diagnosing Celiac...they look for villi damage by doing a biopsy.

Your symptoms sound correct for celiac.

About the meds....if you have celiac then the treatment is teh gluten-free diet. Make sure any meds the prescribe you are gluten free...they will not automatically prescribe you gluten-free meds...you have to do the checking!

Did they take biopsy's?

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Hello-

I'd like to let everyone know that I have really appreciated all the info I have found so far in this forum. Thanks to everyone for all the help you give to the members here!

Some background on my questions:

I had an endoscopy on Monday. My husband and I were told that the doctor saw "slightly flattened villi" and that this looked like Celiac Disease. When the biopsy results came in yesterday, we were told the bowel biopsies were normal so it is not Celiac. Instead they said the stomach biopsies showed reactive gastropathy. When I asked the nurse about what the doctor originally told me, I couldn't get a straight answer. My questions are this:

1) Is it possible to "see" flattened villi via endoscopy?

2) If it wasn't damage, then what WAS the doctor seeing?

3) Has anyone else had this happen?

4) Could the stomach "irritation" aka gastropathy, be caused by gluten? I'd rather not take the drugs they prescribed for it if I don't have to

If it helps, here is a little background:

About January I started having diarrhea, abdominal pain, "bubbly intestines" etc and began waking up multiple times every night. I was tired all the time and sometimes weak

The beginning of April I tested negative for TTG IgA and my total IgA was normal. No other Celiac tests were performed

My brother had high TTG IgA scores and an inconclusive biopsy so has not been diagnosed as Celiac. He has been on a gluten-free diet for about a year and a half and the response has been incredible

I received my Enterolab results today (didn't think the GI doc was going to do an endoscopy):

21 Antigliadin IgA

20 Antitissue Transglutminase IgA

HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Thanks in advance 8^)

Jennifer

Your results from enterolab show a clear antibody reaction to gluten plus a celiac gene. The term reactive gastropathy means that your GI system is reacting to something that is destroying it. In light of the fact that he was able to see visible damage I would go under the assumption that the biopsy was a false negative. With your enterolab results, the flattened villi and a brother who has responded well to the diet now is the time for you to get on it. I would give the diet a good go before I started the meds, perhaps you could use pepto for stomach discomfort until it ends. Going on the gluten free diet is not going to effect the results of any other testing you need to have done if it does not resolve your problems and you don't need your doctors permission to try it.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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Hi j_mommy,

Thanks for the tip on checking the meds for gluten! They did take a biopsy in the small bowel. I forgot to ask how many though. It's on my list of follow-up questions for when I see the doctor again in December.

Jennifer

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Your results from enterolab show a clear antibody reaction to gluten plus a celiac gene. The term reactive gastropathy means that your GI system is reacting to something that is destroying it. In light of the fact that he was able to see visible damage I would go under the assumption that the biopsy was a false negative. With your enterolab results, the flattened villi and a brother who has responded well to the diet now is the time for you to get on it. I would give the diet a good go before I started the meds, perhaps you could use pepto for stomach discomfort until it ends. Going on the gluten free diet is not going to effect the results of any other testing you need to have done if it does not resolve your problems and you don't need your doctors permission to try it.

Hello-

I'm with you on the meds! In this case, I kind of feel like they're trying to fix a symptom instead of the cause. It's nice to hear someone else thinks similarly.

I had decided to base my next steps on the Enterolab results, so I've already started back on the gluten free diet. I've actually tried it several times. The first two times I became even sicker. Once I realized that I couldn't tolerate soy or dairy, I tried again sans gluten-free snacks that had soy flour or dairy. That time things worked out much better. I actually slept straight through a couple of nights! I think it's the soy that really gets my digestive tract (enterolab came back 52 soy and 18 casein). Unfortunately I only had a couple of weeks to try the diet before going back on wheat because I didn't want to mess up any testing the GI doc would do

Anyway, thanks for basically verifying my impressions on this!

Jennifer

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Guest j_mommy

JenPen,

Just wanted to let you know that for some it takes awhile to see results on the diet! Give it time to work.

Also you shouldn't have to wait for biopsy results until dec.....they usually have them back within a week....call and get your results!!!!!

Good Luck, Jess

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