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moldlady

Eucharist And Communion Bread

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I've only recently gone off of gluten (7 weeks now), and just realized that all communion wafers have wheat in them. :huh:

What does everyone else do? :(

ML

After engaging in multi-page forum brouhahas which resolve nothing, we all agree to disagree, go our separate ways, and do as our conscience dictates. :o:lol::unsure::blink::ph34r:

Search the forum for any relevant term and you'll see what I mean!


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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If you are Catholic, a good, easy alternative, is to just receive the cup. It's best to sit in the front to avoid contamination.

I agree with home_bases_mom though .... there is a lot of info if you search the board. ;)

You can also get low-gluten hosts from some Benedictine sisters .... I just opted for the cup myself.

Here is a link to the US bishop's official declaration on the matter ..... http://www.usccb.org/liturgy/celiasprue.shtml


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Thank you everyone for your responses.

I did do a search first and the only thread that came up was the one with 1,888 pages. I just didn't want to read all of those.

I'm not sure what to do at this point. ....

ML

I'm in the same situation....I tried just taking the cup, and then realized that I was very sick every Monday after church. There were a few Sundays that I didn't go to church and I wasn't sick on those Mondays! I was going to look into the rice wafers and see what my church says about them. They are pretty progressive for Catholics, so we will see. I don't like to draw attention to myself, so I haven't taken care of this just yet.


Diary free 11/06-6/08

Now using a small amount of low-lactose dairy such as aged cheeses and yogurt. Yum!

Gluten-free since 4/07

"When you row another person across the river, you get there yourself."

- Fortune Cookie

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Thank you everyone for your responses.

I did do a search first and the only thread that came up was the one with 1,888 pages. I just didn't want to read all of those.

I'm not sure what to do at this point. ....

ML

I don't know what you used to search. I know that this topic has come up many times in multiple threads. A search of this site using Google and the argument communion wafer will produce about 90 hits. About half are duplicates since there are two versions of this board, and Google finds both this one and the one at www.glutenfreeforum.com/lofiversion but you should find what you need.

As mentioned, this topic has been the source of much rancor here. It all revolves around different interpretations of "do this in remembrance of me."


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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I'm so glad to be alive and back on the internet in time for both major celiac Easter problems-the communion wafer issue and "do Cadbury's eggs contain gluten?" :) I hope things work out well for the individuals who wish to take communion this Easter.


I don't eat gluten and neither do my cats

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I don't know what you used to search. I know that this topic has come up many times in multiple threads. A search of this site using Google and the argument communion wafer will produce about 90 hits. About half are duplicates since there are two versions of this board, and Google finds both this one and the one at www.glutenfreeforum.com/lofiversion but you should find what you need.

As mentioned, this topic has been the source of much rancor here. It all revolves around different interpretations of "do this in remembrance of me."

I used the term "eucharist" and maybe that was too specific. I did not intend to bring up a subject that caused so much trouble. Just didn't see it anywhere and wondered what people thought.... that's all.

ML

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ML no problem. It has been a touchy subject, but you are a relatively new member and would have missed the previous eruptions. Most posts have used the word communion which is a synonym for the less common word eucharist. Be well.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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gI've only recently gone off of gluten (7 weeks now), and just realized that all communion wafers have wheat in them. :huh:

What does everyone else do? :(

ML

If it's helpful, Here's the scoop: "low gluten alter breads" have 0.01 percent gluten content. You can order at 1 800 223-2772. You purchase them for your church to use for you.

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I've only recently gone off of gluten (7 weeks now), and just realized that all communion wafers have wheat in them. :huh:

What does everyone else do? :(

ML

I recently began making phone calls to our church and other celiacs in the area to see how best to approach this (I'm thinking dd is almost 5 and I have to contemplate First Communion). Many churches do not accept/use the low gluten host or anything that doesn't contain the wheat starch. However, you can receive the cup as it is now considered equal to receiving the host. And, if you talk with your parish priest, he may also set aside a separate cup for you to avoid cross-contamination issues. If they know what mass you are attending ahead of time, they are usually willing to accomodate in an unobtrusive way.


Vicky

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Vicky, the parish should accept the low-gluten host approved by the American bishops. You could print out the page from the bishop's website that I posted to give to your priest. But the approved low-gluten host is made from wheat starch and you would still have to address cc concerns.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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to answer your original question...

We use the low gluten hosts. I started by talking to our parish priest, and he told me that they already had one Celiac parishioner for whom these are provided. Our arrangement is that the presider always has the special host, and my son goes to his line regardless of where we are sitting. We normally go to the same Mass time each week, but check in briefly in case there is a substitute priest.

I buy the hosts to provide to my son's Catholic school for Mass there.

I keep a few extra at home in the freezer for when we are travelling, as we will be this year for Easter.

When we travel, we bring a host and get to the church early to talk to either the priest or Mass Coordinator, and take it from there. We have done this at three out-of-town churches, and so far everything has gone smoothly.


Bev

Mom of Garrett - Mizzou freshman; diagnosed Jan 2005

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Vicky, the parish should accept the low-gluten host approved by the American bishops. You could print out the page from the bishop's website that I posted to give to your priest. But the approved low-gluten host is made from wheat starch and you would still have to address cc concerns.

Thanks CarlaB.

The trouble is....if there is such a thing as a "super" celiac, my daughter would be one of them. Plus she has multiple food allergies/intolerance to all dairy, eggs and soy as well. So I'm a bit hesitant to go for the low gluten host, even reading that the gluten content is negligible because I do not know what else is in it. Perhaps at that point I am dealing more with the psychological aspect of things. But it's hard to overcome that as my dd will have GI distress with even minimal skin contact with gluten. I do not feel comfortable making the decision to experiment with this because she is the one who will physically pay the price. And I don't think that's a fair bargain. I do not want her to associate communion as being a negative experience...which is why I am planning a bit far ahead. ;)

Thanks to everyone for sharing such great information!


Vicky

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Thanks CarlaB.

The trouble is....if there is such a thing as a "super" celiac, my daughter would be one of them. Plus she has multiple food allergies/intolerance to all dairy, eggs and soy as well. So I'm a bit hesitant to go for the low gluten host, even reading that the gluten content is negligible because I do not know what else is in it. Perhaps at that point I am dealing more with the psychological aspect of things. But it's hard to overcome that as my dd will have GI distress with even minimal skin contact with gluten. I do not feel comfortable making the decision to experiment with this because she is the one who will physically pay the price. And I don't think that's a fair bargain. I do not want her to associate communion as being a negative experience...which is why I am planning a bit far ahead. ;)

Thanks to everyone for sharing such great information!

The ingredients are posted at the Benedictine Sisters website. Like all hosts for the Catholic Church, it's wheat and water, nothing else. Of course, in this case, it's very low gluten in the wheat.

But I understand. I used to be VERY sensitive. If she's that sensitive, I'd get her a separate chalice to have. I went to a Catholic Supply shop and bought one! She would certainly feel very special, perhaps making up for not receiving the host. :) I used mine for masses at retreats, etc., but it would be an easy way to be sure she was receiving from a different chalice than the rest of the parishoners.

I play flute at Mass, and the choir receives first, so there was never any problem with being sure I was the first one to receive out of the chalice. I've seen other parishes that let parishoners go up to the front to receive with the eucharistic ministers, though this option would be awkward for a child. Sitting in the front is also an easy option.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Forgive my ignorance as I am not Catholic, but do you all share / drink from the same cup? :unsure:


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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Forgive my ignorance as I am not Catholic, but do you all share / drink from the same cup? :unsure:

Yes. It is a cup help by a person and handed to each parishoner. We all go up to the front to receive communion. In larger parishes, there are several lines around the parish, in smaller, everyone goes up the center aisle. It is wiped between every person, but obviously this is not enough for contamination issues since everyone receives the Host prior to the cup. Also, people who are sick generally abstain from receiving the cup.

Sometime you should just go sit in on a Catholic Mass ..... for the second half, look over the Gospel narratives on the Last Supper. :)


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Yes. It is a cup help by a person and handed to each parishoner. We all go up to the front to receive communion. In larger parishes, there are several lines around the parish, in smaller, everyone goes up the center aisle. It is wiped between every person, but obviously this is not enough for contamination issues since everyone receives the Host prior to the cup. Also, people who are sick generally abstain from receiving the cup.

Sometime you should just go sit in on a Catholic Mass ..... for the second half, look over the Gospel narratives on the Last Supper. :)

Thanks for the clarification. I may do that some time. The only time I have been in a Catholic church is for weddings and funerals. Otherwise I am in my church a LOT :D working with kids, on missions, choir, assorted projects - and worship service followed by Sunday school! We have communion the first Sunday of the month and always read the Scripture ~ either of the Last Supper itself or one of Paul's references to it ~ as we take the elements. In all the Protestant churches I have attended or been a member of, whether the elements are passed down the aisle or the parishioners go up to get them, everyone has their own disposable cup. I assume it is for sanitary reasons.

Anyway, thanks again for the clarification! I knew you could and would give me the answer I was looking for! :D


Sandi ~ learning to live in a world obsessed and infested with wheat.

"You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows" probably was not referring to us . . .

"For the love of money gluten is a root of all sorts of evil, and some by longing for it have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs." (apologies to 1 Timothy 6:10 (NASB)

The person we most dislike is still a soul for whom Christ died. (David Jeremiah)

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If you are not Catholic, most (all?) Protestant churches do not require wheat to be in the wafer/bread.

You can use a gluten-free communion wafer, gluten-free bread, rice cracker, corn chip, etc. Best to speak with the pastor beforehand, of course.

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Yes. It is a cup help by a person and handed to each parishoner. We all go up to the front to receive communion. In larger parishes, there are several lines around the parish, in smaller, everyone goes up the center aisle. It is wiped between every person, but obviously this is not enough for contamination issues since everyone receives the Host prior to the cup. Also, people who are sick generally abstain from receiving the cup.

Sometime you should just go sit in on a Catholic Mass ..... for the second half, look over the Gospel narratives on the Last Supper. :)

You need to talk to your priest about this! According to Catholic tradition, a PIECE OF THE EUCHARIST MUST BE PLACED IN EACH CUP - ie lets put gluten into the cup. If you watch a Catholic service, you can watch the priest take pieces of the host and place it into each cup at the Altar. Unless you have an arrangement with your priest and he knows about your condition the chalice will still contain gluten. In addition, the Eucharist is given PRIOR to the cup so it also gets cross contaminated by all of those who don't have a problem. I have a separate cup and he has me go up last - he also got special dispensation from the Bishop to NOT place any of the Body of Christ into the chalice because of my condition (and that of my oldest son who is going to receive First Communion this year!). It is a valid communion to receive only the Blood of Christ. I tried the low Eucharist host first (and still had reactions) so I don't recommend it unless you have a very mild intolerance to Gluten.

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I am a Catholic Priest who is also a coeliac. If there is more than one chalice used at Mass, the priest puts a piece of the consecrated bread into only one chalice, not every chalice. Some priests may place a piece in every chalice, but this is not required by liturgical rubrics.

The theological issue with the host is that it must be made of wheat. Any other matter is not valid matter (e.g. rice etc). Wheat, by nature contains gluten, hence the church has determined that there must be a minimal amount of gluten in the host to make it valid matter. This minimum amount has been researched as I understand to be tolerable for mst coeliacs, although I cannot say necessarily for all. In which case, my advise would be to receive only from the chalice.

I know that some people won't like me saying this, but it needs to be said in "truth", that is to use rice "bread" or non "wheat" matter to make communion wafers makes the matter "invalid", and as much as I might like to believe it is the body of Christ, or believe it in "conscience", the reality of the Church's 2000 years of belief, teaching and tradition is that it is not the Body of Christ. And, without going into the sacramental theology of it, this teaching can never change because Christ determined the "matter (or the material, i.e. bread) at the last supper and the Church is obliged to be faithful to this.

Personally, I use a low gluten host. I am just over two years diagnosed and sill have problems - but I think this is other factors. In my last intestinal biopsy about 8 months ago my villi had returned to normal. But I know that my case cannot and does no translate for everybody.

I can empathise with everybody and their concerns in this area ad don't want to infame disagreement. What I have said is in strict accordance with the Church's teaching. When people talk about "conscince", it must be an informed conscience, not a conscience that says "I disagree and believe what I want". One needs to understand why the Church teaches what she teaches in this area and why she cannot change her teaching on this matter. The word "conscience" literally means "with knowledge", by which is meant that I make an informed decision knowing all the facts. It not a little "inner voice" as many people think. But if a person wants to believe a circle is square, that is their right, but it doesn't make them right!

My apologies if this is not what people want to hear, but it is as the Church teaches, which I am obliged as a priest to do. I suffered as a coeliac for most of my 53 years, only being diagnosed nearly three years ago. My villi had all but disappeaed (total atrophy). I suffered all the symptoms that most of you talk about and still do! If I could change things in regards Holy Communion, I would, but I know it is impossible theologically. So even if I wanted or the Pope wanted, it is something that cannot be changed. In the meantime, if it is not possible to recieve the consecrated host, then receiving from the Chalice is the other option, which I do when I forget to bring along my "low gluten bread". Again theologically, Catholics believe Christ is fully present in both the consecrated brad and wine. It was this belif that permitted and continues to permit the Church to distrbute communion under one or the other species (bread or wine) and not have to distribute under both.

In writing this, all I want to do is to be as clear as possible in defining what the Church teaches. Unfortunately, there are many things in life that are hard or seem unfair. But, when I suffer fro my coeliac condition, - yes I sometimes complain, but in my faith, I try to join these sufferings to those of Christ, and I look around me and see so many people suffering far worse problems than me, and I count myself lucky.

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Caeli,

Thanks so much for the clarification. It's nice to see you again, as I have often wondered how you were doing with your Celiac.

Take care :)


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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