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masterjen

Meaning Of A Test Result

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I was sent for some blood-work, and one of the tests that was done (referred to as an "ANA Screen") was to determine if there is evidence of another auto-immune condition. The results was "Titre 1:80, Pattern: speckled; Interpretation: uncertain without results of correlated blood-work" . That it for results from the immunology section of the blood tests I had. [The others looked at liver and pancreatic enzymes (considered only mildly elevated) and bilirubin (which was normal).] Anyone have some knowledge about the ANA screen blood-test, what my results mean, and/or what needs to be done to get further answers to interpret these results?

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The ANA is usually used to screen for lupus and similar autoimmune disorders. You result: Speckled is associated with SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, and mixed connective tissue disease.

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I also have elevated ANAs and was diagnosed with Sjogren's Syndrome...this was before going gluten free and I haven't been retested since. I was 1:40 then, a few years ago. Everyone has ANAs, but not everyone's is elevated. After much research into the matter, you must have symptoms and the test results to be diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder. Since I don't have symptoms of Sjogren's, I'm operating under the fact that I may have the genes but that they haven't necessarily expressed themselves yet. As you probably know, all automimmune disorders respond well to a non-gluten (and non-casein) diet, so I've decided to just focus on a good diet, stress relief, and forgetting about the test altogther unless symptoms appear later.

BTW, Sjogren's often accompanies Celiac Disease.

Another interesting fact. 5% of the population has elevated ANAs, but only 2.5% have an auto-immune disorder. That leaves 2.5% with elevated ANAs for no apparent reason, and are consider healthy individuals. Let's put ourselves in that category. :)

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I also have elevated ANAs and was diagnosed with Sjogren's Syndrome...this was before going gluten free and I haven't been retested since. I was 1:40 then, a few years ago. Everyone has ANAs, but not everyone's is elevated. After much research into the matter, you must have symptoms and the test results to be diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder. Since I don't have symptoms of Sjogren's, I'm operating under the fact that I may have the genes but that they haven't necessarily expressed themselves yet. As you probably know, all automimmune disorders respond well to a non-gluten (and non-casein) diet, so I've decided to just focus on a good diet, stress relief, and forgetting about the test altogther unless symptoms appear later.

BTW, Sjogren's often accompanies Celiac Disease.

Another interesting fact. 5% of the population has elevated ANAs, but only 2.5% have an auto-immune disorder. That leaves 2.5% with elevated ANAs for no apparent reason, and are consider healthy individuals. Let's put ourselves in that category. :)

One more thing. The pattern is the first step in figuring out the automimmune disorder, but they can dig a little deeper with a follow-up test and determine which disease you may be at risk for. I don't remember all the technical terms but I have the SSB type, which is associated with Sjogren's and rules me out for Lupus and the other automimme diseases listed by the other poster above. Hope that helps.

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Thanks for your help, L. f. a.!!

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