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kannne

More Fiber, Bether Texture..?

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I want to improve my bread recipe. Here in norway we don't have much "cool" stuff like you have in US. We can't buy sorghum flour in the store, they don't have xanthan gum either.. If the store is large they may have buck wheat flour..

But since my friends are going to US I am want them to shop for me.

And if it work in my bread and the people that buy my bread like it I will need to find a way to get it to norway ;)

I have been given an advice to ad Soy Lecithin Granules to the bread. I read that it make the bread get a better texture. Has anyone tried this?

Have anyone tried Inulin powder?

It is supossed to add more fiber to the bread.

Does anyone else has any idea of what I can add to get more fiber into the bread?


SCD diet.

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More fiber won't necessarily give a better texture. Some types of fiber may help more than others. And some can make the texture worse. I have tried inulin powder in bread, and it didn't seem to do much of anything. However, I haven't tried it with my latest techniques, so I could try again and see what happens if you like. Thing is, inulin is a type of fructan molecule, and I read someplace that inulin breaks down into simpler fructose molecules when heated above a certain temperature. So it may not be adding as much fiber as it would appear.

For more fiber, teff flour, unhulled buckwheat flour, bean flours, and even coconut flour, would be the ones I'd try first.

What types of flour do you have access to in Norway? Ordering over the Internet can be expensive, but that may be an option too.

The lecithin won't resolve the problem you're having with the new flour you bought. It can however, improve moistness and shelf life.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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More fiber won't necessarily give a better texture. Some types of fiber may help more than others. And some can make the texture worse. I have tried inulin powder in bread, and it didn't seem to do much of anything. However, I haven't tried it with my latest techniques, so I could try again and see what happens if you like. Thing is, inulin is a type of fructan molecule, and I read someplace that inulin breaks down into simpler fructose molecules when heated above a certain temperature. So it may not be adding as much fiber as it would appear.

For more fiber, teff flour, unhulled buckwheat flour, bean flours, and even coconut flour, would be the ones I'd try first.

What types of flour do you have access to in Norway? Ordering over the Internet can be expensive, but that may be an option too.

The lecithin won't resolve the problem you're having with the new flour you bought. It can however, improve moistness and shelf life.

In the store:

Rice flour, corn flour/starch, potato starch, soy flour.

Some places: Buck wheat, millet, teff.

Most of the gluten-free flour is "ready" mixes made from wheat starch, corn, potato, teff, rice ++ We have several types but I don't like to use them.

I can order other types of flour on internet but they are very expensive.

The mix I use know contains 6,1% fiber.


SCD diet.

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Teff will add fiber, flavor, and give a more substantial crust. It also helps with browning in the oven, and has a nice aroma IMO. Millet is usually very similar to sorghum, and can often be used in place of sorghum and rice flours. Buckwheat can be very different from one brand to another. It depends on whether it has been hulled before milling, and the variety of buckwheat being used. I find it is generally better for sweetbreads than for sandwich-type breads, as it provides a more delicate crumb (texture inside the bread). Unhulled buckwheat flour will be brownish-gray, while the hulled type is typically off-white or light gray, more similar to rice flour. The unhulled type has more fiber content.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

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