Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Scott Adams

    Altered Gluten Proteins Still Trigger Intestinal T-cell Responses in Celiacs

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Gastroenterology. 2003 Aug;125(2):337-344.

    Celiac.com 08/07/2003 - This studys aim was to determine the feasibility of altering gluten proteins to make them harmless to those with celiac disease. Unfortunately the altered protein still produced a toxic T-cell reaction in almost half of the patients studied. Here is the abstract:



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    Intestinal T-cell responses to high-molecular-weight glutenins in celiac disease.

    Molberg O, Solheim Flaete N, Jensen T, Lundin KE, Arentz-Hansen H, Anderson OD, Kjersti Uhlen A, Sollid LM.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The chronic, small intestinal inflammation that defines celiac disease is initiated by a HLA-DQ2 restricted T-cell response to ingested gluten peptides after their in vivo examination by tissue transglutaminase (TG2). To date, celiac disease can only be treated by a lifelong abstinence from foods that contain wheat, rye, or barley; better therapeutic options are hence needed. An attractive target would be to identify nontoxic wheat cultivars or components thereof with intact baking qualities. Because these qualities are mainly determined by the high molecular weight (HMW) glutenin proteins of gluten, it is critical to know if these proteins are toxic or, more specifically, if they will trigger the activation of T cells in the celiac lesion.

    METHODS: Different, highly purified HMW glutenins were isolated from wheat cultivars or expressed as recombinant proteins. The proteins were first tested for recognition by a large panel of gluten-specific T-cell lines established from celiac lesions and then applied during ex vivo challenges of celiac biopsies to allow for a direct identification of HMW specific T cells.

    RESULTS: Intestinal T-cell responses to TG2-deamidated HMW glutenins but not the corresponding native proteins were detectable in 9 of the 22 adult and childhood celiac disease patients tested.

    CONCLUSIONS: T cells within celiac lesions frequently recognize deamidated HMW glutenin proteins. This finding questions the possibility of implementing these proteins in novel food items destined to be nontoxic for celiac disease patients.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 03/16/2004 - According to Dr. Erika Jensen-Jarolim, professor of medicine and immunology at the University of Vienna, there may be a connection between the development of food allergies and the use of antacids. Dr. Jensen-Jarolim presented her teams preliminary findings at the World Allergy Congress on September 10, 2003. Individuals who take medications that reduce or neutralize the acidity in the stomach may be at a higher risk of developing food allergies, possibly caused by normally harmless food proteins passing in tact through the digestive system. Normally acid and pepsin break down food proteins before they pass into the digestive...

    Scott Adams
    Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Jan;100(1):177-85
    Celiac.com 06/30/2005 – In order to determine whether celiac disease mucosal lesions may have a patchy distribution that would require more than one biopsy sample to make an accurate celiac disease diagnosis, Italian researchers closely examined the detailed biopsies taken from 112 consecutively diagnosed children. All of the children in the study had positive anti-endomysium (EMA) or anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) antibodies, and each underwent an upper GI endoscopy in which 4-5 biopsies were taken from Treitz and/or distal duodenum, intermediate duodenum, proximal duodenum, and the duodenal b...

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 02/27/2006 - Kappler M, Krauss-Etschmann S, Diehl V, Zeilhofer H, Koletzko S. Detection of secretory IgA antibodies against gliadin and human tissue transglutaminase in stool to screen for celiac disease in children: validation study. BMJ. 2006 January 28; 332(7535): 213-14.
    Study Abstract:

    Objective:
    To evaluate two commercial stool tests for detection of secretory IgA antibodies against gliadin and human tissue transglutaminase for diagnosis of celiac disease in children with symptoms.
    Setting: Tertiary care childrens hospital.
    Participants: Coded stool samples from 20 children with newly diagnosed celiac...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/27/2013 - Patients with villous atrophy and negative celiac disease serologies pose a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma.
    When doctors are unable to determine what is causing villous atrophy in a patient without celiac disease, they usually classify it as a case of "unclassified sprue." However, doctors currently know very little about the best way to treat and manage cases of unclassified sprue.
    To get a better picture of this dilemma, a team of researchers recently examined the connections between villous atrophy and negative celiac serology.
    The research team included M. Degaetani, C.A. Tennyson, B. Lebwohl, S.K. Lewis, H. Abu...