Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Scott Adams

    FDA Rules Gluten-Free Fermented or Hydrolyzed Foods Must Utilize Only Gluten-Free Ingredients

    Scott Adams
    4 4
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      New FDA rule requires food manufacturers who wish to label a product as "gluten-free" to ensure that products containing fermented, hydrolyzed ingredients meet the definition of “gluten-free” before fermentation or hydrolysis.


    Soy sauce fermenting. Image: CC BY 2.0--Joi
    Caption: Soy sauce fermenting. Image: CC BY 2.0--Joi

    Celiac.com 08/24/2020 - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a final rule to establish compliance requirements for fermented and hydrolyzed foods, or foods that contain fermented or hydrolyzed ingredients, and that bear the "gluten-free" claim. 

    The new rule requires food manufacturers to ensure that products containing fermented, hydrolyzed ingredients meet the definition of “gluten-free” before fermentation or hydrolysis. 



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    According to the rule "because gluten breaks down during [fermentation or hydrolysis] and currently available analytical methods cannot be used to determine if these products meet the 'gluten-free' definition." 

    That means that products made with wheat or gluten ingredients cannot be labelled gluten-free, even if they test at gluten to levels below 20ppm after processing.

    The rule covers food fermented products including soy sauce, yogurt, sauerkraut, pickles, cheese and green olives, and vinegar.

    The rule will helps to "ensure that common products labeled 'gluten-free' really are gluten-free, and will help to protect individuals with celiac disease," said HHS Secretary Alex Azar. 

    The new rule is very much in keeping with the original FDA rule on gluten-free labeling forbids products made with wheat or gluten ingredients to be labeled "gluten-free." 

    Are Distilled Products Gluten-Free Under New FDA Rule?

    The ruling specifically states that distilled products like vinegar, whiskey, gin and vodka, are considered gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease, even if these products are made with gluten ingredients. 

    The ruling is in keeping with the positions of most allergy, celiac and dietary organizations, which have long considered distilled products to be gluten-free. The rule just means that distilled products made with wheat or gluten can now advertise as "gluten-free." Distilled products have long been regarded as gluten-free by EU standards. 

    Anyone with celiac disease who wishes to avoid these products, or who cannot tolerate them well, should continue to avoid them.

    Anyone with celiac disease who tolerates distilled products made from wheat or gluten ingredients, including whiskey, gin or vodka, can continue to enjoy them.

    In either case, they are unlikely to contain gluten, and are likely safe for people with celiac disease. So, if you tolerate whiskey and other spirits made from gluten, cheers!

    Read more at FDA.gov
     

    Edited by Scott Adams

    4 4

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Well written, Scott. Thank you.  

    I would like to point out in your one link: "...distilled products like..."... Not all vinegar is distilled. And this may be a point of confusion for some folks who are new to this. Might want to re-word that sentence slightly. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Apparently not: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinegar

    "The term "distilled vinegar" as used in the United States (called "spirit vinegar" in the UK, "white vinegar" in Canada) is something of a misnomer because it is not produced by distillation but by fermentation of distilled alcohol."

    It can be made from almost any fruit or grain high in starch or sugar, including wheat. 

     

    Edited by trents

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    thank you for the update.  I usually stick to Mezzetta brand olives because they are labeled gluten-free,  but I just compared my Kalamata to green olive jars...the Kalamata has the certified label, and the Green has only the gluten free words...could this difference be due of the vinegar in Green olives?  

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 minutes ago, Jenny8413 said:

    thank you for the update.  I usually stick to Mezzetta brand olives because they are labeled gluten-free,  but I just compared my Kalamata to green olive jars...the Kalamata has the certified label, and the Green has only the gluten free words...could this difference be due of the vinegar in Green olives?  

    I checked Green olive jar again.  No vinegar.  I wonder why Green olives only were mentioned in your article.  

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest ANTHONY COLATRELLA

    Posted

    I think there may still be some confusion here because the FDA does NOT regulate distilled spirits(liquors)--the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau does and they still DO NOT recognize distilled spirits made from gluten containing grains as gluten free and such distilled spirits still cannot be labeled as such---their rule remains in effect and the FDA 's 2020 rule does not change the ATTB rule so this FDA 2020 rule DOES NOT apply to distilled spirits--essentially the FDA and the ATTB rules are NOT ALIGNED in regard to distilled spirits--nor is the ATTB rule aligned with most Celiac organizations which do consider distilled spirits gluten free and safe for celiacs

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest ANTHONY COLATRELLA

    Posted

    In reading this over it seems to me there is a contradiction concerning vinegar--in one paragraph you state--" products made with wheat or gluten ingredients cannot be considered gluten free even if they test at gluten  to levels  below 20ppm after processing. The rule covers fermented food products including soy sauce....etc., along with distilled foods including vinegar" and then in the section-ARE DISTILLED PRODUCTS GLUTEN FREE UNDER NEW FDA RULES you state- "distilled products like vinegar, .. etc. are considered gluten free and safe for people with celiac disease even if ..made with gluten ingredients".  Seems like a direct contradiction to me!---unless there were NO vinegars made with gluten ingredients- but that is not true--I can think of one---malt vinegar .  So which of these statements is accurate?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Malt vinegar is fermented, not distilled. The new rules state that anything distilled is gluten-free, no matter the source. Hydrolyzed products made using wheat or other gluten grains cannot be used in gluten-free products, and must declare "wheat" on the label if wheat is used to make it.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    8 hours ago, Guest ANTHONY COLATRELLA said:

    In reading this over it seems to me there is a contradiction concerning vinegar--in one paragraph you state--" products made with wheat or gluten ingredients cannot be considered gluten free even if they test at gluten  to levels  below 20ppm after processing. The rule covers fermented food products including soy sauce....etc., along with distilled foods including vinegar" and then in the section-ARE DISTILLED PRODUCTS GLUTEN FREE UNDER NEW FDA RULES you state- "distilled products like vinegar, .. etc. are considered gluten free and safe for people with celiac disease even if ..made with gluten ingredients".  Seems like a direct contradiction to me!---unless there were NO vinegars made with gluten ingredients- but that is not true--I can think of one---malt vinegar .  So which of these statements is accurate?

    @Guest Anthony Colatrella: YES. This was my point. Thank you. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest ANTHONY COLATRELLA

    Posted

    19 hours ago, Scott Adams said:

    Malt vinegar is fermented, not distilled. The new rules state that anything distilled is gluten-free, no matter the source. Hydrolyzed products made using wheat or other gluten grains cannot be used in gluten-free products, and must declare "wheat" on the label if wheat is used to make it.

    Yes, sorry right after posting that comment I recalled malt vinegar was a fermented product and not distilled--so per FDA officially a distilled food product no matter the original ingredients is safe for celiacs---nonetheless the statements I highlighted still sound contradictory to me and could be a source of confusion and apparently at least one other reader thinks so  

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest ANTHONY COLATRELLA

    Posted

    On 9/2/2020 at 11:12 AM, Guest Celiac09 said:

    Hi. Not sure what you mean, I thought all vinegars were distilled. 

    Hope I am not misinforming you as I am not an expert in vinegar production but no-not all vinegar is distilled---much is a product of fermentation only---if the vinegar is made from fermentation of an alcohol(usually a fruit based alcohol) presumably the alcohol was distilled but all vinegar is not made from alcohol but fermentation of other products---now not to get more complicated I believe even when the vinegar is made from alcohol the FDA will require that the enzymes or the bacteria themselves that are used to ferment the alcohol must be grown on media that is gluten free which had not been the case previously

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    If the vinegar is fermented, then all ingredients used to make it must be gluten-free for it to be labelled gluten-free. If the vinegar is distilled, it can be labelled as gluten-free no matter what ingredients are used to make it, so distillation renders it gluten-free. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/21/2014 - It’s official! Since August 5th, 2014, all packaged foods sold in the U.S must comply with new federal rules for labeling foods as "gluten-free." That means that all packaged food claiming to be "gluten-free" must contain less than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten.
    The FDA finalized the rule in August 2013, and gave food manufacturers one year to comply. The rule went into full effect on August 5, 2014. The new standard applies equally to all products labelled “gluten free,” “no gluten,” “without gluten,” and “free of gluten.”
    Until this rule went into effect, many food and product manufacturers were applying the term...

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 06/15/2020 - Usually, when a food manufacturer makes an ingredient change, even a minor one, to a food product, they must produce a new label for all the changed products. However, Covid-19 has changed that. Responding to calls from food manufacturers facing supply chain problems in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is relaxing some labeling requirements for certain ingredients in food in the U.S.
    The move will give food manufacturers the ability make small changes to the ingredients in a product without making label changes. That may mean adding, omitting, or blending ingredients to meet the product...

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 07/24/2020 - In the U.S., hydrolyzed plant protein is gluten-free, safe for people with celiac disease, and appears on Celiac.com's list of Safe Gluten-Free Ingredients. All hydrolyzed plant protein is gluten-free, including soy protein isolate, soy protein concentrate, autolyzed plant protein, hydrolyzed oat flour and textured protein. 
    Hydrolyzed Protein is Gluten-Free. Other names and abbreviations for hydrolyzed vegetable protein include:
    HPP  HVP  Hydrolyzed Plant Protein  Hydrolyzed Protein  Hydrolyzed Soy Protein Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein Hydrolyzed Protein is MSG
    ...

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 08/19/2020 - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ruled that distilled foods and spirits made from gluten-containing grains can be labelled as ‘gluten-free.’ The FDA ruling covers fermented and distilled foods, or foods that contain fermented or distilled ingredients, which are made using gluten-containing grains such as rye, barley and wheat. The ruling changes the previous FDA requirement that distilled products labeled "gluten-free" must contain no gluten ingredients from start to finish.
    The change was hailed by Chris Swonger, president and CEO of the the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (Discus), who said: “W...