Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    How To Find Out if Your Drugs or Medicines Contain Gluten

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 05/06/2015 - Gluten is a common ingredient in many commercial food products. Less commonly known, however, is that many manufacturers use gluten as an inert ingredient in such products as medications, supplements, and vitamins. For people with celiac disease, exposure to as little as 30 to 50 mg of gluten per day can damage the mucosa of the small intestine. So, it is important to know the gluten content of prescription and nonprescription medications, even though a lack of labeling laws can make it challenging to find products that are gluten-free.

    Photo: CC-- Yahann LeGrandGiven the lack of resources to verify the gluten content of prescription and non-prescription medications, it is best to check with the manufacturer. Your pharmacist can help make the process a bit simpler than doing it yourself. There are three things you and/or your pharmacist can do to determine the gluten status of any prescription drug. First is the use of a package insert (PI). You or your pharmacist can use the PI to review drug formulations, and find contact information for pharmaceutical manufacturers.



    Celiac.com Sponsor:




    Gluten is used in numerous medications, supplements, and vitamins, often as an inert ingredient known as an excipient. For prescription medications, the PI should include a detailed listing of excipients; however, if this information is not readily available, the FDA provides drug labeling information for prescription and some OTC medications at DailyMed (dailymed.nlm.nih.gov). 

    For non-prescription products, there often is nothing in the PI regarding gluten content, which means you will likely need to check with the manufacturer to be sure.

    Second, you or your pharmacist can visit company websites to help determine whether a medication potentially contains gluten.

    Third, you can find manufacturer contact information on the product or its packaging, by conducting an Internet search using the manufacturer's name, or by accessing online drug-information resources such as Clinical Pharmacology, Facts & Comparisons, and Martindale. When requesting information from a manufacturer, it is helpful to provide the lot number.

    Recent research by Mangione and colleagues showed that information about the gluten content of non-prescription products is usually available and easy to access through the manufacturer.

    Fourth, there are some third-party websites, such as GlutenFreeDrugs.com, which is maintained by a clinical pharmacist, contains a detailed chart listing selected brand and generic medications that are gluten-free, as well as those free of lactose or soy. However, this is not a comprehensive or definitive list of products, as ingredients and formulations can change from lot to lot in the manufacturing process.

    Lastly, Celiac.org, the Celiac Disease Foundation offers a variety of resources and provides information on the treatment of celiac disease, tips on living gluten-free, and support-group contact information.

    Source:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Melissa Blanco
    Celiac.com 12/11/2009 - I recently embarked on a quest for family-friendly restaurants that offered gluten-free selections.  I explained this vision to my husband and three children as we set the rules of our experiment: five family members to eat at five restaurants during a five week period.  The challenge - the children were to choose the restaurant, the chosen restaurant couldn’t...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/07/2012 - Many people with celiac disease will tell you that getting a proper diagnosis is just part of the battle. Maintaining a strict gluten-free diet, and getting adequate medical follow-up care can be nearly as challenging as getting a proper diagnosis.
    A group of researchers, led by Joseph A. Murray, MD, AGAF, of Mayo Clinic, confirms that assessment in a...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/24/2014 - To create a gluten-free, allergen-free station in a dining hall that serves about 10,000 to 14,000 students each week, and offers a different daily menus for each meal, Lehigh University in Bethlehem went the distance. The result was Simple Servings.
    Lehigh's earlier dining hall offered gluten-free cereals, soups, pastas and breads via their Your Choice...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/16/2014 - More than half of U.S. chain restaurants plan to expand their gluten-free menus in the next year, according to a national menu price survey by restaurant supply-chain co-op SpenDifference.
    "Operators recognize that a growing number of customers have health-related dietary restrictions, and they are revamping their menus to include choices for them, as...

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    Love the positivity of this post, thank you! I am also extremely prone to getting anxious and getting lost on the internet looking at more concerning reasons for symptoms. However, was diagnosed officially yesterday after biopsy results came...
    Hello everybody. I frequently used this forum prior to being diagnosed and appreciated every bit of advice and similar experiences I could find. So I've created an account to give back and tell my story, in the hope that if someone out there s...
    Did you ever find out what this is? I have the SAME exact thing. 
×
×
  • Create New...