Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Jules Shepard

    Multi-Grain Confetti Gluten-Free Muffins

    Jules Shepard


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 01/18/2009 - This recipe was born of my new year's desire to experiment with new grains and flavors to achieve more nutritious results in my baking.

    I was speaking to a support group last Friday night and one of the audience questions was about this very topic: the concern that gluten-free baking often produces less healthy results. I completely agree.



    Celiac.com Sponsor:




    Now, much of my gluten-free baking and recipes are already on the low-sugar and low-fat end of the spectrum - something I feel very strongly about in my own diet. Take that statement with a grain of Southern sugar though, because this Southern girl knows that sweets still have their place! As I said in my discussion Friday night, chocolate chip cookies were never meant to be good for you!

    However, wherever possible, I try to reduce the sugar, bake with fruits to reduce the fats, and use alternatives for low glycemic values (like using agave nectar). I also substitute so that most all of my baking now is dairy-free, or I at least offer dairy-free options that are just as good. So many of us celiacs really cannot do the dairy anymore anyway, and gluten-free casein-free diets are finding their way into more and more of our homes as well.

    Enjoy these muffins in good health!

    Multi-Grain Confetti Gluten-Free Muffins

    These muffins are aptly named, as they include a host of alternative gluten-free grains and flours, and when broken open, look like a big new year's party! A beautiful, aromatic and healthy muffin - what a great way to start the year off right! If you don't happen to have any of these other grains on hand, simply use the same measurement of my Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour.*

    Ingredients:

    • 2 cup chai tea: add your favorite chai mix to 1/2 cup hot water (according to package portion directions) OR steep 3 chai tea bags in 1/2 cup lowfat milk (dairy or soy, rice or almond)
    • ½ cup gluten-free oats (I used Gifts of Nature brand)
    • 4 Tbs. butter or Earth Balance Shortening or Buttery Sticks
    • 1/3 cup granulated cane sugar (or granulated Splenda)
    • 2 Tbs. agave nectar or 3 Tbs. honey
    • 2 eggs
    • ½ cup natural applesauce, apple butter or pumpkin butter
    • 1 cup Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour™
    • ½ cup almond meal or brown rice flour
    • 2 Tbs. (1/8 cup) flaxseed meal
    • 2 Tbs. (1/8 cup) mesquite flour
    • 2 tsp. gluten-free baking powder
    • ½ tsp. baking soda
    • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
    • (½ tsp. vanilla + 1 ½ tsp. pumpkin pie spice if not using flavored chai mix)
    • 1 ½ cups chopped berries (cranberries, blueberries, etc.)
    • 1 cup chopped walnuts (optional)
    Directions:
    Coat muffin tins with cooking oil or line with muffin papers. Preheat oven to 325 F convection (preferred) or 350 static.

    In a small glass bowl (for microwave) or a small saucepan (for stovetop), combine the prepared chai tea with the oats and boil for 2 minutes, stir, cover and set aside.

    Whisk together the dry ingredients and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, cream the butter with the sugar. Beat in the agave nectar or honey, applesauce, eggs and finally, the cooked oat mixture. Gradually stir in the dry ingredients and mix until smooth. Lastly, fold in the chopped berries and walnuts, if using.

    Fill the muffin tins 2/3 full and bake until they are light brown: approximately 15 minutes for mini muffins or 22 minutes for regular muffins. Remove from oven, let cool in the pan.

    *This recipe calls for my Nearly Normal All Purpose Flour. You can find the recipe for this flour in my cookbook, Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating or in various media links on my website, nearlynormalcooking.com, where you can also by this mix ready-made. It produces amazing results in all your gluten-free baking!

    Multi-Grain Confetti Gluten-Free Muffins
    Finished Multi-Grain Confetti Gluten-Free Muffins



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Atop each of Jules Shepard’s free weekly recipe newsletters is her mantra: “Perfecting Gluten-Free Baking, Together.” From her easy-to-read cookbook (“Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten Free Eating”) to her highly rated reference for making the transition to living gluten free easier (“The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten Free”), Jules is tireless in the kitchen, at the keyboard and in person in helping people eating gluten free do it with ease, with style and with no compromises.
     
    In the kitchen, she creates recipes for beautiful, tasty gluten-free foods that most people could never tell are gluten free. As a writer, she produces a steady stream of baking tips, living advice, encouragement and insights through magazine articles, her web site (gfJules.com), newsletter, e-books and on sites like celiac.com and others. Jules also maintains a busy schedule of speaking at celiac and gluten-free gatherings, appearing on TV and radio shows, baking industry conventions, as well as teaching classes on the ease and freedom of baking at home.
     
    Her patent-pending all-purpose flour literally has changed lives for families who thought going gluten free meant going without. Thousands read her weekly newsletter, follow her on Twitter and interact with her on FaceBook.  

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    When I started eating gluten-free food I discovered a flour mix in a book called Living Healthy with Celiac Disease, Wendy Wark (AnAffect, 1998). In addition to the standard gluten-free flour mix of tapioca starch flour, potato starch flour and rice flour she added cornstarch and sweet rice flour. The addition of these two flours make a huge difference in the texture, flavor...

    Jules Shepard
    I've been trying to will the coming of warm springtime weather by baking foods I'll want on my next picnic.  No matter that my kids and I eat them on a tablecloth spread out on the living room floor ... our hearts are in the great outdoors!  Whether you're picnicing indoors or out, these filling snack bars will be a treat everyone will enjoy.  Using a hodgepodge mix of dried fr...

    Jules Shepard
    Correctly measure your flour. When measuring flour, don’t scoop from the bag with your measuring cup.  This compresses the flour.  Use a spoon to scoop flour into the measuring cup and level off with a knife. This will ensure that your flour is measured properly. Bring your ingredients to room temperature before mixing. It is particularly important for yeast recipes to bring all...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/20/2013 - A team of researchers recently looked at the influence of various proteins on the quality of gluten-free bread formulas. Specifically, the team looked at the influence of different concentrates or isolates of protein on the structure, properties and aging of gluten-free bread.
    The research team included Rafał Ziobroa, Teresa Witczakb, Lesław Juszczakc, and ...

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    I'll see if the owner of GliadinX will chime in here...
    I guess I didn't make myself clear. I need a condensed soup (like Campbell's) to use in recipes. I guess I could use regular soup and thicken it with corn starch.
    Yes, if you don't have consistent gluten intake prior to the blood tests they are almost useless.  My antibody levels went from very high to normal in one month gluten-free. 
×
×
  • Create New...