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    Scott Adams

    Natural Killer Cell Activity in Celiac Disease - Czech Republic

    Scott Adams
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    Castany M, Nguyen H, Pospisil M, Fric P, Tlaskalova-Hogenova H
    Natural killer cell activity in coeliac disease: effect of in vitro treatment on effector lymphocytes and/or target lymphoblastoid, myeloid and epithelial cell lines with gliadin
    Folia Microbiol, 1995 (Praha) 40; 6: 615-620.



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    In this study researchers tested the levels of natural killer cell activation in normal people and compared the results with treated celiacs, and found no significant difference. However, after exposing the celiacs blood to gliadin for thirty minutes the researchers found a reduced activation of natural killer cells, which is the bodys first line of defense against malignancy. These results provide further support to the theory that gluten is a carcinogen to celiacs.

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    I was just diagnosed with celiac disease a few weeks ago. Later I had a blood test, where I found out that my natural kill cells were next to nothing. According to the doctor a normal number would be a least 100, to have twenty was bad. My test results said I had less that 5. So, my doctor started me on immune globulin shots to try to bring up natural kill cell numbers. I am also on a gluten-free diet. So, hopefully I am going to see some changes.

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    I found another group of doctors that did a similar test to the 1995 test that is talked about above. The name of the doctors Grose RH, Thompson FM, Cummins AG. in Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University of Adelaide, Woodville South, SA 5011, Australia. 2007. Here is a link to those results "Deficiency of 6B11+ invariant NK T-cells in celiac disease" I myself have celiac disease, and my last blood test shows that I have very low Natural killer cells way below the normal number. I wonder if that could be a precursor to intestinal cancer? I hope not. . .

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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