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Do Vitamin Supplements Benefit Celiac Patients?

Celiac.com 03/10/2009 - A recent study confirms that B-vitamin supplements are helpful in raising vitamin B6, B12 and folate levels and in reducing homocysteine levels in people with celiac disease.

Celiac disease is a typical malabsorption syndrome, and is associated with higher rates of numerous deficiencies, including folate and vitamin B12. People with celiac disease face higher rates of Hyperhomocysteinemia than do healthy controls.

A team of Dutch researchers led by Dr. Muhammed Hadithi recently set out to evaluate the efficacy of daily supplements of vitamin B6, B12 and folate on homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease.
The study measured levels of vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and fasting plasma homocysteine in 51 adults with celiac disease and 50 healthy control subjects of similar age and sex.

The results show that the celiac disease subjects who used vitamin supplements had higher blood levels of vitamin B6 (P = 0.003), folate (P < 0.001), and vitamin B12 (P = 0.012) than celiac patients who did not use supplements, or healthy controls (P = 0.035, P < 0.001, P = 0.007, for vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12, respectively).

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Patients who use vitamin supplements also showed lower levels of plasma homocysteine than in patients who did not (P = 0.001) or healthy controls (P = 0.003). Vitamin B6 and folate were both associated with homocysteine levels, whereas vitamin B12 was not. Twenty-four (48%) of 50 controls and 23 (50%) of 46 of the celiac disease patients carried the MTHFR thermolabile variant T-allele (P = 0.89).

The research team concludes that Homocysteine levels are dependent on Marsh classification and the regular use of B-vitamin supplements reduces of homocysteine levels in patients with celiac disease.The study confirms earlier studies suggesting that both the presence and severity of celiac disease determined homocysteine levels.

The regular use of supplemental B vitamins resulted in higher levels of serum vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12 and lower levels of plasma homocysteine in patients with celiac disease. Moreover, supplemental B vitamins seem to offer protection against the effects of villous atrophy on homocysteine levels, independent of the genetic susceptibility status as determined by carriage of the C677T polymorphism of 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase.


World J Gastroenterol. 2009;15:955–960

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5 Responses:

 
Barbara Feeser
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said this on
23 Mar 2009 3:58:41 PM PDT
There doesn't seem to be much information out on celiac &amp; gluten food and side effects. I found out 2 years ago I have Celiac Disease and it has been hard to become gluten free due to the fact so much is hidden.
I am very glad to find good information that will help me return to good health.

I am looking forward to your articles and the help they will do.

Thank you.

 
Marie Zarankevich
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said this on
02 Apr 2009 8:51:59 PM PDT
I have read about about celiac causing extreme Thiamine (B1) deficiency, and the consequent result of congestive heart failure due to the effects of BeriBeri. Perhaps this should be added to your list of recommended supplements.

 
Jo Lucas
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said this on
06 Apr 2009 2:24:44 PM PDT
Thank you for this information. It explains why very expensive B shots 'appeared' to work for over 2 years for my father. Ultimately he died of non-hodgkins lymphoma which my research indicates could have resulted from untreated celiac disease.

 
Dan Lappin
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said this on
19 Jun 2010 11:45:32 PM PDT
I suggest that you change the title of this article to 'Role of B vitamins to reduce homo cysteine in celaic patients. I wish I had read this article months ago. I just started using Trimethylglcine and have had life changing benefits. I am a person with long standing gluten intolerant symptoms that only two years ago got clear on the gluten connection. This is a great article, it is not well titled. Please change the title so that others can get this info.
Thanks, Dan

 
Mary Rodgers
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said this on
22 Oct 2011 8:08:52 PM PDT
At age 80, 2 years ago, I went to IU Medical Hospital Diagnostic clinic. After testing three months, I was told I have refactory celiac. I was told I was born with celiac Thank you for this article. A gluten-free diet has stopped all pain and improved my digestion, but I am still anemic and cannot gain weight and am very weak. This
week my doctor made tests about vitamins.
After reading your information - at last I have hope !!!




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Exactly what are your allergy symptoms? Were they IgG or IgE? Allergy testing as a whole is not super accurate -- especially the IgG. Were you on any H1 or H2 antihistamines for the last five days when you were tested? As far as celiac testing, four days without consuming gluten probably would not impact testing.

I've been seeing my dr for a few weeks now about my stomach issues. We've ruled out the gallbladder and h-pylori and today I had the celiac blood tests done. From the reading I've done the past two days, it seems to me that it's highly likely that I have it. I've had digestive issues for years, but they've gotten progressively worse over the past 6 months or so. Pain and nausea when eating, bloat, eternal constipation, dh rash, at it's worse, tight cramp-like pain in a fist under my sternum, radiating through my back and around my right side keeping me up at night. Also heartburn/reflux and trouble swallowing, etc. Anyway, about 2 months ago, I needed a change. I didn't go to the dr immediately because it seemed pointless. (I've mentioned stomach ache when eating to drs before and been blown off.) So, I started the Whole30 elimination diet (takes out soy, grains, dairy, peanuts, and leaves you basically eating meat & veggies). Figured it would show me what I needed to take out of my diet and hopefully feel better. It worked- I felt great! And it seems that grains and gluten are my biggest offenders. But, now I've been off gluten prior to celiac testing. It's been 7 weeks. After 4 weeks I tested steal cut oats, that I later found out were probably glutened. And then nothing until yesterday. Yesterday I had 2 pieces of bread and a muffin and today I had two pieces of bread and then the blood test. Is this going to be enough to show up on the tests? My dr said that it would probably show up, since I had some yesterday and today and was currently having symptoms. But, google seems to say that I should be glutened for 2 wks straight before testing. Has anyone tested positive after just a little gluten? If it's negative should I insist on doing it again after weeks back on gluten? I feel awful, but do want clear answers. Obviously, gluten's not going to be a part of my life any more either way.

So just to clarify had not consumed any gluten for about 4 days before testing. I was assured by my allergist that it wouldn't affect the test. But what was alarming was that she retested my food allergies (my most recent reaction was two weeks ago) and every food allergy I have came back negative. I don't understand how that is possible. These food allergies developed when I was 20 and I am almost 24 now.

Thanks! You too! I have learned from this experience to take charge of my own health. It's nice at least that we can try the gluten-free treatment without a firm diagnosis or a doctor confirming the disease. I've also felt some of the gluten withdrawal symptoms, and my stomach pain ebbs and flows, but I'm determined to stick with the gluten-free diet to see what a difference it makes. Gemini, thank you! This was really validating and useful for me to hear. I've felt so confused through this process and just want some answers. If the biopsy results do come back negative, I'm going to follow your advice and do the gluten-free diet with repeat blood testing after a while. If they come back positive, well, then I'll have my answer. I'm supposed to get them back next week.

I have celiac and eosinaphalic esophagitis. I was put on a steroid inhaler recently. I use it like an inhaler but swallow the air instead of breathing it in. You may want to look into EOE and it's relationship to celiac. Just a thought. My swallowing and celiac seem to be related.