No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Antireticulin Antibodies Obsolete as Test for Celiac Disease

Celiac.com 04/22/2013 - A recent study of celiac screening methods shows that testing for antireticulin antibodies (ARA) in patients with celiac disease is obsolete. The study includes a review of the medical literature, and recommendations for improved celiac blood screening.

Photo: CC--aurostar739Researchers S. L. Nandiwada, and A. E. Tebo are affiliated with the Department of Pathology of the University of Utah, and ARUP Laboratories in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Citing advances in celiac disease-specific serologic testing, Nandiwada and Tebo are calling for the elimination of ARA as a test for diagnosing celiac disease.

People with celiac disease nearly always carry HLA-DQ2 and/or -DQ8 haplotypes, suffer from any of a range of diverse clinical presentations, including gluten-sensitive enteropathy.

Ads by Google:

Celiac disease patients typically produce several autoantibodies, of which endomysial, tissue transglutaminase, and deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies are considered specific indicators of celiac disease.

Although antireticulin antibodies (ARA) have traditionally been used to screen for celiac disease, these tests do not provide the best sensitivities and specificities for celiac screening.

This review highlights recent advances in celiac-specific blood testing and supports the elimination of ARA from celiac disease screening and diagnosis.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



3 Responses:

 
dappy

said this on
29 Apr 2013 6:16:00 AM PST
Several years ago, my blood tested positive for these antibodies. I would like to know WHY this is no longer deemed that relative???

 
Patricia S. Arnold
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
29 Apr 2013 11:20:34 AM PST
I am so happy to see that your group is continuing to push the medical field to do a better job of diagnosing celiac disease! I was 62 before I found out what was making me so ill! My life could have been so much better and much much less painful had this been detected prior to that. I nearly died before it was found! Thank you so much!

 
Judy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
22 Dec 2013 6:41:13 AM PST
They also need to push the government in allowing even 20 ppm traces of gluten in foods labeled Gluten Free. It does not matter how much it still effects us. I am so angry that the government can decide this without regards to the celiac or the gluten intolerant. I feel the government is just trying to keep the physicians and pharmaceutical companies in business.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Celiac Disease is damage to the nooks and crannies in our intestines leading to malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies with all the various symptoms that make it so hard to diagnose. Then you add years of the antacids, antibiotics, Tylenol, opioids, alcohol, etc., each with their own particular side ...

We use pure cherry juice with our snow cone machine. Makes for a nice dessert after dinner.

Hi Kurasz, How's it going? Any change for the amazingly better? Or slightly better? If not, hang in there, and keep praying! :)

Garden of Life brand Dr. Formulated Organic Fiber. It's certified gluten free. Also free of psyllium husk, dairy and soy. Also found that just simply increasing fiber intake works wonders. Perhaps try skipping a protein for at least one meal and fill up on veggies and fruits.

When you're looking for answers the negative endoscopy may seem like bad news in a funny way, it did for me when the doctor told me, but really as CL said it's good. Keep working with your doctors. From what you've said before gluten could still be the problem. Now you've eliminated celia...