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Celiac Disease Doubles Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

Celiac.com 05/05/2014 - People with celiac disease face double the risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session.

Image: Wikimedia Commons--Van BrusselThe data for the study were gathered by researchers using electronic health records of patients from 13 participating health care systems between January 1999 and September 2013. Out of a total of nearly 22.4 million patients, they found 24,530 with celiac disease. Patients without celiac disease served as controls.

The researchers found was no difference in smoking status or diabetes rates between the two groups. Those with celiac disease had slightly higher cholesterol levels, but lower rates of high blood pressure.

All patients were adults. For both groups, the team found comparable rates of traditional risk factors for coronary artery disease including sex, race, diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and smoking.

Overall, the researchers found a significantly higher rates of coronary artery disease among patients with celiac disease compared to the control population. The rates were 9.5 percent for patients with celiac disease, compared to 5.6 percent, of the general population.

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Data showed a similar trend among younger patients, those under age 65, with with 4.5 percent of patients with celiac disease compared to 2.4 percent for those without celiac disease.

People with celiac disease have some persistent low-grade inflammation in the gut that can spill immune mediators into the bloodstream, which can then accelerate the process of atherosclerosis and, in turn, coronary artery disease," said R.D. Gajulapalli, M.D., clinical associate at the Cleveland Clinic and co-investigator of the study.

These findings “reinforce the idea that chronic inflammation, whether it's from an infection or a disease, can have an adverse role in coronary artery disease and general heart health, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors," Gajulapalli said.

The team was surprised by the “strength of the association, especially in younger people,” and, in addition to further study, they are calling for patients and doctors to be aware of this association.

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6 Responses:

 
Janice
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said this on
05 May 2014 6:09:30 AM PDT
It would have been helpful if the study indicated whether the patients with celiac disease were following a gluten-free diet.

 
Morna
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said this on
13 May 2014 6:02:23 AM PDT
Since it was a study generated from electronic health records, without patient interviews, the study could not have included that variable. Still, an interesting study.

 
Dave
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said this on
12 May 2014 5:11:09 AM PDT
I had the same thought, Janice. Am I inducing the mentioned inflammation even though I am gluten free?

 
Julie
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said this on
12 May 2014 8:40:58 AM PDT
I agree--helpful to know if these people were on a GF diet or not. Although you could assume if the inflammation is there, maybe they weren't? Not sure.

 
Jacqueline
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said this on
13 May 2014 6:32:31 AM PDT
I will definitely bring this information to my primary care physician. I had a CRP test done, and it showed some inflammation, so this is a concern.

 
Afifah
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said this on
05 Jul 2014 10:11:40 AM PDT
I would like to add that, although there is no information about compliance with a gluten free diet, what is very likely is that the celiacs eat a good deal of products labelled 'gluten free', and I know that it is actually not possible for any cereal grain to be truly free of glutens, as these are essential part of all grains. There is no doubt at all that corn/maize, rice, sorghum and millet have glutens in. So, if there is still a higher rate of cardiac ill health in celiacs it is probably that they are still eating cereal grains and therefore glutens, just not the glutens that cause reactions in their guts, but in other organs or tissues, such as the heart and blood vessels. I recommend a diet free from all cereal grains, rice, maize, millet, sorghum included, AND buckwheat, quinoa, amaranth and the potato starch as these either have similar proteins in their grains (e.g. buckwheat does) or are just a high starch product, which will engender a low grade chronic inflammation anyway as starch IS glucose and a diet high in glucose (which is the breakdown product of all carbohydrates) will naturally increase inflammation. So I recommend avoiding all those foods with glutens and other immune system triggers (like lectins, dreadful things!) which includes all beans/legumes, all grains or grain-like substances, and keeping inflammatory industrial seed oils out (e.g. sunflower oil, soya oil, corn oil etc) and instead eating the diet we actually evolved on, which is meat, fish, offal, eggs, leafy vege and fresh fruits (by which I mean edible berries, as they are low in sugars but high in nutrients). And I like to encourage the use of dairy products as long as they are the high fat ones, like clarified butter (ghee), and fermented dairy, i.e. cheeses and yogurts and kefir. These are incredibly useful, and, as long as you don't have an allergic reaction to them, are very very health promoting. Enjoy real food again and steer clear of all manufactured stuff.




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Going to suggest a whole foods only diet, no process foods or dairy for now til you start healing, Many of us suffer from deficiency issues as mentioned before, common ones are Magnesium, B vitamins, Iron, Vitamin D vitamin d E, folate, the list goes on. I really do suggest starting with magnesium in the form of Doctors Best or Nature Vitality Calm, the doctors best is easier on the stomach while the calm seems to be more effective if you can deal with it (magnesium Citrate is harsh on the stomach and can cause D) I also suggest a blended supplement for b-vitamins like Liquid health Stress and Energy and the Neurological Support from the same company, 1 tbsp each 2-3 times a day works wonders for energy. You might have to look into additional supplements you might be low in and for this I suggest talking to a dietician and getting tested to see about your levels. As for pain and suffering normally you get over the withdrawal and healing starts after 2-6 weeks on a strict gluten-free diet that means no contamination or cheating. I suggest replacing most cooking appliances, cleaning everything, using freezer paper for a prep surfaces, new pans, cooking utensils, and use new liners/organizers in your drawers. Power scrub your oven and run on a cleaning cycle, same with fridge/freezer. Got to get rid of every crumb and residue there is. I suggest tossing any baking dishes with scratches, cookie sheets, roasting pans and getting new ones. Lining things with foil when cooking helps, New toasters is a must. When I started out I did so with just a toaster oven, microwave, and combo rice cooker/steamer/crock pot. Did roasted veggies, steamed dishes, stews, and got a bunch of microwave cooking ware like omelette makers, etc so I could cook safe gluten-free meals for myself. Later I slowly got new pots, pans baking supplies, utensils etc.

That's a great question to ask. Thanks for arming me with good ones. I'm doing my research to be able to stand my ground. Ironically, my endo. Was the most helpful doctor I'd seen and my GP has generally not seemed to have a clue. I have PCOS and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, when I moved to the area and saw him, he was resistant to refer me to an endocrinologist (before I moved to the area, I'd already been seeing an endo. For three years for follow ups since I'd been diagnosed.) My endo. Was able to treat the thyroid antibodies well, they went down without synthroid or surgery (which previous doctor's had suggested). However, I think she dropped the ball on the Celiac blood panel (which I think endos should Definitely be more aware of). And my GP seemed much more aware on this issue. I think the takeaway is always do your research, advocate for yourself, and let second opinions fill in the gaps in knowledge some on your care team may have. (But also, ditch them if they don't know what they're talking about) Also, I live in an area with a doctor shortage... Thanks for the welcome to the community!

?

Silk Cashew milk is pretty creamy and close to dairy milk, I love Macadamia milk, almond milk is a tad thin in most brands but a good sub and normally enriched with calcium, vitamin D and E. Coconut milk is a bit acquired and can range greatly in consistency, rice milk is normally very thin like 2% school carton milk and bland. Elmhurst Harvest has started making SUPER rich and creamy milks with walnuts, almond, and macadamia nuts, with talk of bringing back the pistachio milk. I personally love the almond and cashew blends from blue diamond or silk. If you need a nut free version Good Karma makes a decent flax milk. There are a few other brands out there that make some good ones here locally I love the HEB Organics almond milk best almond milk I have ever tasted rich, fulfilling, and just perfect. NOTE, avoid the shelf stable versions from almond dream, cashew dream, blue diamond, silk, HEB they are normally much thinner and bland. Cheese, On block cheeses Dayia makes a good Havarti, smoked Gouda, and cheddar. the shreds from there are pretty bad in taste. Follow your Heart makes a great provolone and decent on everything else. Lisanatti makes godly good shreds for jalapeno jack, cheddar, and mozzarella, they melt better then real cheese as they lack the greasy oil mess. Their blocks on the other hand are way to soft. Julian Bakery makes a passable mozzarella but only if your melting it over something or in something the flavor and texture is off but it is the only cheese I found you can order on amazon lol. Kite Hill makes some really good soft cheeses, I tried a few others like hedei ho and found they are too salty or the flavor way to off to even call cheese. Ice cream there is Nada Moo, and So delicious for some of the top dairy free ones. I personally can only have one called wink which is a unsweetened one. Yogurt the So delicious and kite hill take the top in my opinion but they are the only ones that make a good unsweetened so I can not comment on others. I make my own parmesan and cheese sauces from scratch myself from various ingredients. Even make my own cheddar biscuits and cheesy garlic breads. Hell just made a batch of cheesy cheddar and chive biscuits this morning, OHH the buttery goodness of Nutiva Butter flavored coconut oil I love cooking with, sauteing, and using in savory foods. last week I found it was great with carb free noodles and herb seasoning. I am thinking of using it in my cauliflower Alfredo sauce next time also.

From what I've read 2 slices a day should be enough for the challenge. I think they'll have more gluten than the milky way's. Now I want a milky way Have one for me tomorrow dalek100!