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Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

Celiac.com 09/23/2015 - Wheat products are a key component of human diets worldwide. Despite the many beneficial aspects of consuming wheat products, it is also a trigger for several diseases such as celiac disease, wheat allergy, and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS).

Photo: CC--Mike RollsA team of researchers recently set out to examine the relationship between celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity and irritable bowel syndrome.

The research team included M El-Salhy, JG Hatlebakk, OH Gilja, and T. Hausken. They are variously affiliated with the Section for Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Stord Hospital, Stord, Norway, the Section for Neuroendocrine Gastroenterology, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway, the National Centre for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, Department of Medicine, and the National Centre for Ultrasound in Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.

Celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have similar gastrointestinal symptoms, which can result in celiac disease patients being misdiagnosed as having IBS.

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Therefore, celiac disease should be excluded in IBS patients. A considerable proportion of celiac disease patients suffer from IBS symptoms despite adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD).

The inflammation caused by gluten intake may not completely subside in some celiac disease patients.

It is not clear that gluten triggers symptoms in NCGS, but there is compelling evidence that carbohydrates in wheat such as fructans and galactans do.

Based on their results, the team feels that it is likely that NCGS patients are a group of self-diagnosed IBS patients who self-treat using a gluten-free diet.

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3 Responses:

 
Posterboy
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said this on
24 Sep 2015 5:21:35 PM PDT
Based on a previous post less than two months ago I think this is "bad" science for lack of a better word.

http://www.celiac.com/articles/24058/1/Large-Number-of-Irritable-Bowel-Syndrome-Patients-Sensitive-to-Gluten/Page1.html

This study indicates 84% of IBS patients as they say "a large number" of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients are Sensitive to Gluten.

The same team of doctors say in summary " that the term of IBS might be misleading and may change or delay an "effective and well-targeted treatment strategy in gluten sensitive patients."

It should be noted these IBS patients were Rome III positive in this study indicating at least NCGS but still 84% were being diagnosed as IBS.

 
Anthony
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said this on
27 Sep 2015 9:03:43 AM PDT
Good article; gave me a better understanding of the relationship of IBS and Celiac disease - medical conditions I both suffer.

 
Suzanne Cook
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said this on
30 May 2017 4:04:44 PM PDT
I have had IBS for years and just suffered with it. When we moved/retired to the family farm, I needed to work for about four more years, which I did. Since my work as a paralegal didn´t fit in with farm work, I had a 30 mile commute, one way. I would get up at 4:00 am and make sure I had done my IBS work, then leave for work. A good friend told me to read the book "Wheat Belly." I did and saw all the additives they put in our food. I went gluten free. My IBS quit. Went to specialist who said I didn´t have IBS, nor gluten sensitivity. I thanked him and left. This was three years ago...no gluten, no IBS.




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