No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter





Ads by Google:


Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts
SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Children with Celiac Disease Have Different Genetic Signatures than Adults

Celiac.com 03/02/2016 - A team of researchers recently completed the first extensive study comparing gene expression in children and adults with celiac disease, and found some key differences between the two groups.

Photo: CC--Nicolas BufflerThe research team included V. Pascual, L. M. Medrano , N. López-Palacios, A. Bodas, B. Dema, M. Fernández-Arquero, B. González-Pérez, I. Salazar, and C. Núñez. They are variously affiliated with Servicio de Pediatría, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, and Servicio de Inmunología Clínica at the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria del Hospital Clínico San Carlos (IdISSC), Madrid, Spain, and with the Departamento de Producción Animal, Facultad de Veterinaria, and the Departamento de Estadística e Investigación Operativa I, Facultad de Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid in Madrid, Spain.

For their study, the team collected 19 duodenal biopsies of children and adults with celiac disease and compared the expression of 38 selected genes between each other, and in 13 non-celiac disease control subjects matched by age.

The team used a Baysian methodology to analyze the differences of gene expression between groups. They found that, compared to controls, children and adults with celiac disease all had seven genes with a similarly altered expression. These were C2orf74, CCR6, FASLG, JAK2, IL23A, TAGAP and UBE2L3.

Ads by Google:

The team found differences in 13 genes, six of which were altered only in adults (IL1RL1, celiac disease28, STAT3, TMEM187, VAMP3 and ZFP36L1) and two only in children (TNFSF18 and ICOSLG); while four genes show a significantly higher alteration in adults (CCR4, IL6, IL18RAP and PLEK) and one in children (C1orf106).

Between the two groups, the team found significant differences in the expression level of several genes, most notably the higher alteration seen in adults.

The team is calling for further research to assess possible genetic influences behind the changes, along with the specific physical consequences of the reported differences.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Please re-test the board...I believe that the issues should be fixed. Please let me know...and thank you!!!

Are these safe? The ingredients are:. Whole grain oats, sugar, canola oil, rice flour, honey, salt, brown sugar syrup, baking soda, soy lecithin, natural flavor. I am new at this, but nothing says no to me. Am I wrong?

Love bacon and eggs but don't think it would be a good idea to eat it everyday Not sure about oats. I didn't handle KIND Raspberry Granola (w/oats) well. But that was when I was adding milk.

I feel your pain. Gluten free and corn free is difficult. I eat Erewhon rice Crisps or Barbara's makes a rice crisp cereal as well. You can also try yogurt. Read the ingredients some have corn syrup or corn starch. Just an fyi for you high fructose corn syrup does not contain any corn.

That's terrible. I've been wondering why you haven't been around last few days. I Should have remembered your con. I'm so sorry it wasn't what you were hoping for. We all tend to make mistakes when we're excited about stuff, makes our brains go a bit wonky. hope your dads mouth wasn't dirty ...