No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Does the Preferential Expression of HLA-DQ2.5 Genes in Celiac Disease Impact T Cell Response?


Photo: CC--Money Images

Celiac.com 05/30/2016 - People with HLA genes have the highest risk factor for developing autoimmune disorders. The vast majority of people with celiac disease carry the HLA DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles, both of which encode the DQ2.5 molecule.

A research team recently set out to examine the implications for anti-gluten T cell response of the preferential expression of HLA-DQ2.5 genes associated with celiac disease with respect to non-predisposing HLA genes. The research team included L Pisapia, A Camarca, S Picascia, V Bassi, P Barba, G Del Pozzo, and C Gianfrani. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Protein Biochemistry-CNR, the Institute of Genetics and Biophysics-CNR in Naples, Italy, and the Institute of Food Sciences-CNR in Avellino, Italy.

In order to activate pathogenic CD4+ T lymphocytes, that is, to trigger active celiac disease, it is necessary for the body to form complexes between DQ2.5 and gluten peptides on antigen-presenting cells (APCs). It is widely accepted by clinicians that the DQ2.5 genes establish the different intensities of anti-gluten immunity, depending on whether they are in a heterozygous or a homozygous configuration, that is, whether both genes are activated, or only one gene is activated.

Ads by Google:

The research team's recent study shows that, in celiac patients, HLA DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 gene expression is much higher than expression of non-celiac-associated genes. This, in turn, impacts protein levels and causes a comparable cell surface exposure of DQ2.5 heterodimers between DQ2.5 homozygous and heterozygous celiac patients. As a consequence, the magnitude of the anti-gluten CD4+ T cell response is strictly dependent on the antigen dose, and not on the DQ2.5 gene configuration of APCs.

These findings are important, because they support the idea that the expression of DQ2.5 genes is an important risk factor in celiac disease.

The preferential expression of DQ2.5 alleles observed in this study offers a new explanation of why these genes are so frequently associated with celiac disease and with other autoimmune disorders.

Source:

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



Comments




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


Gluten free 01, I totally agree that gluten free light is not good. I sometimes have to eat every hour. This seems to be related to low cortisol and low female hormones. Maybe also other deficiencies. I don?t think going gluten free is the only solution to this problem. I am sure with the he...

I don't have a lot of time this morning but I did locate organizations section on gluten free label regs in Canada. There may be more info on this in that section that may be helpful in knowing why they are making that change. http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/labelling/food-labelling-for-ind...

Funny you should mention this, I got a offer for some free ones from that company and just turned it down. The only gluten free products from the company are a 2 lines of dedicated nut type bars. The majority of their bars actually contain either barley (gluten grain) like the biscuits etc. Or wh...

There has been a recent recall of veggies because of listeria risk. Here is the FDA list of recalled items in the US and Canada https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm581389.htm

I asked for their two products yesterday,onion and garlic.Onion powder's package doesnt have starch or wheat on ingredient list but garlic powder has corn starch . I dont have any intolerance to corn by the way. They told me they add starch to two of their products so they are not gluten fre...