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Paleo Mexican Stuffed Zucchini Boats (Gluten-Free)


Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - Where are all my Mexican food lovers? This one is especially for you. These Mexican stuffed zucchini boats are a perfect gluten-free party dish. You can cut them up into smaller pieces and serve them as a tray snack that is nutritious and protein packed. I don't know about you but I love when I go to a party and there are plates of healthy items to snack on. I never feel good filling up on just potato chips and veggie sticks. Junk food makes you feel pretty junky.

I really enjoy hosting get togethers at my house. Since I am a mom of three "kids" and am a grandmother as well, I tend to have a full house and like to make healthy gluten-free and sugar-free snacks and meals for my friends and family. No matter how old your kids get, they still always love coming over for a homemade meal. My youngest son is a mexican food "junkie" and really likes this recipe even though it is grain-free as well. He doesn't mind at all giving up the corn tacos. You can change the heat level to whatever you desire too. As always, my recipes are for you to enjoy and alter for whatever suits your taste and likes.

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Ingredients:

  • 4 large organic green zucchinis
  • ½ pound ground free-range turkey, chicken or grass-fed beef
  • 4 slices Canadian bacon
  • ½ small white onion, chopped fine
  • ½ cup Salsa Verde (no preservatives)
  • 1-1/4 cup chopped cilantro
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil or olive oil
  • 1-2 tablespoons chili powder
  • 1 tablespoon tabasco sauce (or to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon pepper or to taste
  • Optional: Grass-fed cheese

Directions:

1. Preheat the oven to 400F.
2. Cut each zucchini lengthwise down the middle, to make 2 halves from each.
3. Take an apple corer and remove the inside, but be careful not to cut into the dark green. Leave about ⅛ inch on sides and bottom. This will be your "boat".
4. Take the zucchini pulp and chop semi fine.
5. Heat 1 tablespoon oil on medium until hot.
6. Add the onion and cook until semi-glossy then add the zucchini pulp and saute for 1 minute. You may add some tabasco at this point if you like spicy or hot.
7. Transfer to a deep bowl.
8. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to the same pan and heat oil on medium.
9. Add ground meat and cook until done.
10. Add to bowl with onions and zucchini.
11. Drain all but 1 tablespoon of the juices and oils and sauté Canadian bacon in same pan until slightly browned.
12. Remove bacon to cutting board - slice into small slices.
13. Add to same bowl.
14. Add Salsa Verde, cilantro, chili powder, Tabasco and salt and pepper to taste.
15. You may add shredded cheese at this point if you desire.
16. Mix all ingredients.
17. Stuff the boats with the mixture and pile them nice and high, then stack them close to one another in a baking dish so they stand upright.
18. Cover with tin foil.
19. Bake for 30 minutes.
20. Remove and let sit still while covered for 5 minutes.
21. If you have extra meat mixture, you may heat the leftover meat as well in the oven.
22. You may serve a little extra protein on the side of each boat with a garnish of cilantro and a touch of hot sauce.
23. Enjoy!

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I am very interested in this too. My daughter tested negative for celiac, but has terrible primarily neurological symptoms. Because she tested positive for SIBO at the time and was having some GI symptoms, I was told it was just a Fodmap issue. I knew better and we have been gluten free for 2 years. Fast forward to this February. She had a SIBO recurrence that I treated at home with diet and herbal antibiotics because I couldn't get the insurance referral. She was doing great. Then stupid me brought in gluten containing chick feed for the new baby chicks we got. Feed dust everywhere. Total mess. Really, no GI symptoms (she was SIBO free by then)...but the neurological symptoms! my daughter couldn't walk for three days. Burning down one leg, nerve pain in the foot. Also heaviness of limbs, headache and fatigue. Better after three days. But unfortunately she had a TINY gluten exposure at that three day mark and had another severe reaction: loss of balance, loss of feeling in her back and arms, couldn't see for a few seconds, and three days of hand numbness, fatigue, concentration problems. Well, I actually contacted Dr. Hadjivassilou by email and he confirmed that the symptoms are consistent with gluten ataxia but any testing would require a gluten challenge. Even with these exposures, antibodies would not be high enough. His suggestion was maintain vigilance gluten free. I just saw my daughter's GI at U of C and she really only recognizes celiac disease and neurological complications of that. But my impression is that gluten ataxia is another branch in the autoimmune side of things (with celiac and DH being the other two). At this point, I know a diagnosis is important. But I don't know how to get there. We homeschool right now so I can give her time to heal when she is accidentally glutened, I can keep my home safe for her (ugh, that I didn't think of the chicken feed!) But at some point, she is going to be in college, needing to take exams, and totally incapacitated because of an exposure. And doctors state side that are worth seeing? Who is looking at gluten ataxia in the US?

Caro..............monitoring only the TSH to gauge thyroid function is what endo's do who don' t do a good job of managing thyroid disease. They should do the full panel and check the actual thyroid hormone numbers.........T3 and T4. The importance of the TSH comes second to hormone levels. In order to track how severely the thyroid is under attack, you need to track antibody levels.......not the TSH. I did not stay with endocrinologists because I found they did not do a very good job and found much greater help and results with a functional medicine MD. You should not have a goiter if your thyroid is functioning well and your TSH is "normal". Maybe they should do a full panel? Going gluten free can have a profound affect for the better on thyroid function and that is something that is becoming more and more accepted today. Ask most people with Celiac and thyroid disease and they will tell you that. My thyroid never functioned well or was under control under after I discovered I had Celiac and went gluten free. It was the only way I got my antibody numbers back down close to normal and they were around 1200 when it was diagnosed with Celiac. I was diagnosed with Hashi's long before the Celiac diagnosis. I am not sure Vitamin D has anything to do with thyroid antibodies but who knows? Maybe it does have an affect for the better. It is really hard to get Vitmain D levels up, depending on where you live. Mine are going up, slowly, even after 12 years gluten-free but I live in the Northeast in the US and we don't have sun levels like they do in the South. I take 5,000 IU daily and that is a safe level to take, believe it or not. I get no sun on my job so the large dose it is! Having Celiac Disease should not stop you from being able to travel, especially S. America. I travel, although I do agree that some countries might be very difficult to be gluten free in. You can be a foodie and travel with Celiac so no worries on that front. You may not be able to sample from someone else's plate, unless they are eating gluten-free too but I have had awesome experiences with food when traveling so you can too!

I don't know what you drank or where.... so here are a few thoughts. - sure, a dive bar might have dirty glasses and serve a cocktail in a beer glass? But a nice reminder place, with a dishwasher, should be fine. If it's a sketchy place, Stick to wine, then it's served in wine glasses that aren't used for beer or bottled ciders in the bottle. - ciders on tap might, just a slight chance, have an issue. Because of beer on tap, mixed up lines, etc. - you may have a problem with alcohol - you may have issues with The high sugar content of the drink. I know I have similar issues if I drink serveral ciders of extra sugary brands - are you positive it was a gluten-free drink? Not this " redds Apple" pretending to be a cider - it's beer with apple flavor. Or one of those " gluten removed " beers?

Hi Stephanie, I'm also from the UK, I've found this site more helpful than anything we have! As already mentioned above, in my experience it could depend on what and where you were drinking. Gluten free food and drink isn't always (not usually) 100% gluten free as you may know, maybe you have become more sensitive to even a trace of gluten that is probably in gluten free food/drink. Is it possible you have a problem with corn, particularly high fructose corn syrup that is in a lot of alcoholic drinks? This was a big problem for me and the only alcoholic drinks I can tolerate are William Chase vodka and gin. I contacted the company last year and all their drinks are 100% gluten and corn free, made the old fashioned way with no additives, so maybe try their products if you like the occasional drink and see how you get on. If you drink out, not many pubs sell their products but I know Wetherspoons do and smaller wine bars may too. l was never a spirit drinker but I must say their products are absolutely lovely! Very easy on a compromised gut too considering it's alcohol. I second the suggestion on seeing a natural health practitioner. I've recently started seeing a medical herbalist, as I've got nowhere with my now many food intolerances since going gluten free last year and I've noticed a difference in my health already.

Sorry for the very late reply and thanks for the replies, I didn't get a notification of any. In case anyone else comes across this and has been wondering the same as I was, I did try a vegetable broth and I did react to it in the same way as if I'd eaten the vegetables. As for the candida, I've been using coconut oil and am seeing a medical herbalist for this and leaky gut. It's only been a few weeks but I've noticed an improvement all round.