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As Other Grains Gain Ground, Wheat Has Never Been Less Popular


Popularity of whole grains soars, but wheat struggles to compete. Photo: CC--Neil Williamson

Celiac.com 10/18/2016 - Whole grains, including gluten-free grains, have never been more popular, but as their fortunes grow as a whole, that of wheat is diminishing.

The whole grains category includes both gluten-free grains, such as quinoa and other ancient grains, and gluten grains, such as barley, rye and triticale, but wheat products have never been less popular, and continue their downward sales slide.

This year, 1,282 new products have registered for the Whole Grain Stamp so far, a pace set to meet or beat last year's record of 2,122 new products; up from 1,666 in 2014 and 1,622 in 2013, according to Cynthia Harriman, director of food and nutrition strategies at the Whole Grains Council. More than half of new products with the Whole Grain Stamp had a gluten-free first ingredient last year, an increase over 33% in 2007 to 2009, according to Harriman. However, even as scientists question the claimed benefits of gluten-free foods, such as weight loss, for people without celiac disease, many consumers are eating gluten-free foods "just for the variety," Harriman said.

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Either way, the market for gluten-free foods is set to approach $5 billion by 2021, up from $2.84 billion in 2014. Going forward, more of that market will go to gluten-free grains, lees to wheat.

Flour used to be the main way consumers bought whole grains, but now consumers and manufacturers are embracing complete, minimally processed whole grains, which can improve product textures, flavors and health benefits.

Sprouted grains are also receiving more attention and are expected to generate product sales of $250 million by 2018. Overall, 27% of consumers say they are eating more whole grains than they did six months ago, according to a recent survey.

Read more at Fooddive.com.

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1 Response:

 
Pippy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
25 Oct 2016 8:27:37 AM PDT
Great to hear!!




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Run to the nearest celiac disease specialty center if you can. Especially with conflicting doc opinions. Where do you live? Honestly, I test positive to only the DGP and the newest research on its specificity is a mixed bag. My recent scope did not show "active" celiac disease but only a slight increase in IELs. I am waiting for my post biopsy appointment with the Celiac specialist next month. But I've been through a couple of GI'S locally and honestly I feel it was definitely worth going to a specialist. Especially when you have some positive blood work but a normal biopsy the doctors really go back and Forth on diagnosis and never really know for certain. Unfortunately given the above I just said I probably still do not know for certain. Sigh. But I trust the specialist to be at the top of his game on the research and at least I can feel confident and comfortable in what his opinion may be next month.

I just got a call from the Kaiser GI department. The doctor who performed the endoscopy was supposed to call me with the results and instead the receptionist did. She said "Dr. X says your biopsy was normal and you do not have celiac disease." Word for word, that's it! So not only did I not get to talk to her the day of my procedure, but not at all! They are printing copy of the biopsy pathology report for me and I'll get it tomorrow. I want to see if it says how many samples they took. At this point, I still feel like crap, still have symptoms and I'm going to try a gluten-free diet to see how I improve, get blood tests again eventually.

I am curious which gene you have? DQ6?

Tapioca is also a common source for "modified food starch."

Thanks for all your help. I got my new test results in. I'm surprised by how fast they came back. It is a different lab (different insurance) and fortunately, it is easier to read, but unfortunately, the results still seem a bit off from a clear cut answer. Gliadin DP Igg was elevated, along with my EMA. The tTG IgA was not elevated on this test, although it was equivocal last time but on a completely different scale since it was from a different lab. It seems odd that the tTG IgA is lower. Does anyone know anything about that? At the same time, EMA and Gliadin DP IgG are higher. I appreciate everyone's input. Until now, I have only been seeing an endocrinologist and my primary care. They both seem to be aware of celiac but not incredibly confident in navigating the diagnosis. My endo shrugged off the first test results as not that high. Obviously, I don't want to have celiac, but I wanted a second opinion. I was glad that my primary care wanted to at least look at tests again. I'm not sure yet what the next steps will be. Celiac Serology Profile with Reflex to Endomysial Antibody (EMA), IgA Titer by IFA NAME VALUE REFERENCE RANGE F Endomys. IgA Screen Positive A Neg. at 1:5 ("") F Endomys. IgA Titer 1:10 A Not Indicated (titer) F IgA 161 70-400 (mg/dL) F TTG IgA 10.7 0.0-14.9 (U/mL) - Reference Range: - 0.0-14.9 U/mL = Negative - >=15.0 U/mL = Positive F Interp Data See Note ("") - Test Negative Positive - Gliadin IgA 0.0-14.9 >=15.0 - Gliadin IgG 0.0-14.9 >=15.0 - TTG IgA 0.0-14.9 >=15.0 - EMA Titer >= 1:5 F Interp Test: See Result Note: ("") - RESULT INTERPRETATION: - Results support a diagnosis of Celiac disease. - TTG, IgA EMA,IgA AGA,IgA AGA,IgG Total IgA - -------- ------- ------- ------- --------- - Neg Pos Neg Pos N/A F Gliadin DP IgG 16.7 H 0.0-14.9 (U/mL) - Reference Range: - 0.0-14.9 U/mL = Negative - >=15.0 U/mL = Positive F Gliadin DP IgA 4.3 0.0-14.9 (U/mL) - Reference Range: - 0.0-14.9 U/mL = Negative - >=15.0 U/mL = Positive