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What's the Connection Between Gluten Sensitivity and Postural Tachycardia Syndrome?


Is gluten sensitivity connected with postural tachycardia syndrome? Photo: CC--Michael Mandlberg

Celiac.com 10/31/2016 - Responding to observations and reports that many patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) adopt a gluten-free diet without medical consultation, a team of researchers recently set out to evaluate the prevalence of celiac disease and self-reported gluten sensitivity in patients with PoTS, and to compare the results against data from the local population.

The research team included HA Penny, I Aziz, M Ferrar, J Atkinson, N Hoggard, M Hadjivassiliou, JN West, and DS Sanders. They are variously affiliated with the Academic Department of Gastroenterology Departments of Cardiology, Radiology, and Neurology at Royal Hallamshire Hospital, and Upperthorpe Medical Centre in Sheffield, UK.

For their study, the team recruited 100 patients with PoTS to complete a questionnaire that screened for gluten sensitivity, related symptoms and dietary habits. They also screened patients for celiac disease. For comparison, they calculated local celiac prevalence from a total of 1,200 control subjects (group 1) and another 400 control subjects (group 2), frequency matched for age and sex, who completed the same questionnaire.

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Overall, 4/100 (4%) patients with PoTS had serology and biopsy-proven coeliac disease. This was significantly higher than the local population prevalence of celiac disease (12/1200, 1%; odds ratio: 4.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.3-13.0; P=0.03). PoTS patients also had a higher prevalence of self-reported gluten sensitivity (42 vs. 19%, respectively; odds ratio: 3.1, 95% confidence interval: 2.0-5.0; P<0.0001).

This is the first study to show a possible connection between gluten-related disorders and PoTS. They note that a prospective study which examines this relationship further might promote better understanding and treatment of these conditions.

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1 Response:

 
Kristin
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said this on
09 Nov 2016 4:35:26 PM PDT
Not surprising. I have celiac disease and dysautonomia/POTS, and my neurologist considers the cause of my dysautonomia/POTS to be autonomic neuropathy from decades of undiagnosed celiac disease.




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I went into menopause at age 42. I didn't know I had celiac until I was 56. Now I know why my menopause was so early.

Have been dealing with splinter hemorrhages on three of my toe nails since February. I did go to my doctor who rightly so did a very complete blood work-up ruling out other diseases such as lupus and RA and referred me to several other doctors to make sure that it was not cancer, endocarditis, or something serious. I went to the doctors. I have done some research on vitamin deficiency and it seems that some link splinter hemorrhages to vitamin C deficiency. For the past 2 1/2 weeks I have been eating 3 clementines a day (in addition to the usual multivitamin that I take) and it seems to be helping the splinter hemorrhages. One has grown out and not returned. Visited my GI doctor today and talked about malabsorption of nutrients as a potential issue. We are doing more blood work and checking nutrient levels. I have to believe it has something to do with the celiac. Sorry I don't have a better answer, but like you am trying to figure this out. Please let me know if you find any answers, and yes, be sure to check with your doctor to rule out anything serious.

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Welcome to the forum. First, you need to get copies of your celiac test to confirm you actually had it done and what the results were. Second, to confirm a diagnosis, you must obtain biopsies via an endoscopy. Were the doctors gastroenterologists? Third you need to research celiac disease. Yes, you can be asymptomatic, but could still have instestinal damage as the small intestine is vast. here is a good place to start: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ You might think you are a silent celiac, but ever been anemic? Had your bones checked?

That's good to know about Texas Children's, unfortunately I don't believe they accept our insurance. Our former pediatrician joined with one of their medical groups and we had to find a new one due to insurance. I'll check out their site though.