No popular authors found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter

Categories

No categories found.







Ads by Google:


Questions? Join Our Forum:
~1 Million Posts
& Over 66,000 Members!



SHARE THIS PAGE:
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Can Probiotics Delay Gluten Intolerance in Children?

Results show that the probiotic strains had a suppressing effect on celiac autoimmunity and may delay the onset of the disease


Can probiotics delay onset of gluten intolerance in children? Photo: CC--Ryan Schneider

Celiac.com 10/09/2017 - New trial data suggests that the probiotic strains Lactobacillus plantarum Heal 9 and Lactobacillus paracasei 8700:2 may provide support for the immune system and delay the onset of gluten intolerance in children.

The findings, recently presented at the International Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi, suggest that Probi's patented probiotic strains have a 'surprisingly consistent' effect on suppressing coeliac autoimmunity and may delay the onset of the disease in children who are genetically pre-disposed to the condition.

"To our knowledge this is the first time a probiotic study has been performed on this specific population and the results show immune-supporting properties of these probiotics as well as a potential preventive effect on the development of CD," said Dr Daniel Agardh of Lund University.

Agardh and colleagues identified and recruited 78 children with a genetic pre-disposition to coeliac disease. The children were as a subpopulation in a multinational and multiyear autoimmunity study with thousands of children.

The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial lasted six months and found that disease-related antibodies were significantly reduced in the probiotic group and significantly increased in the placebo group during the course of the study.

Ads by Google:

Results show that the probiotic strains had a suppressing effect on celiac autoimmunity and may delay the onset of the disease – with tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) decreased in the treatment group, but increased in the placebo group.

In addition, several significant differences were observed between the groups on a cellular level indicating that the probiotic may counteract coeliac disease-associated ongoing immunological and inflammatory response.

"This is an excellent example of a well working collaboration between academia and the industry" commented Probi CEO Peter Nählstedt.

"We see a growing interest in children's probiotics and these results enable Probi to build a product platform for children."

Read more at: Nutraingredients.com

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).












Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
Nancy
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
09 Oct 2017 10:55:35 AM PST
This sounds like great news, however when I researched the original article that disseminated this news, the original referenced article link is broken: the page has been removed from the internet: "https://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Suppliers2/Probiotic-could-delay-onset-of-gluten-intolerance-in-children-RCT-data" The researcher additionally has no article about this study published (as of yet). Can someone verify with the researcher and also verify conflict of interest? The vendor, Probi, has an article on this probiotic and celiac (http://probi.se/sites/all/files/attachment_files/press_release_cd_and_probiotics.pdf) however, I am concerned that the vendor rather than the clinical researcher is publishing the results... so it's not peer reviewed.

 
Jeff Adams
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated ( Author)
said this on
12 Oct 2017 4:39:32 PM PST
The information is simply an update on topics presented at the 2017 Celiac Disease Symposium in New Delhi. As such, it is not intended as a report an a peer reviewed article. I would expect that to come later as research develops further.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:


That is a fascinating read, should be required reading for any scientist really. There are a lot of posts on here and elsehwhere from people who were told that they would / had 'grown out' of it. I had asthma from late childhood and was told similar. I 'grew out of it' 30 years later when I ...

Low levels of B12 can cause this. You may want to supplement with a sublingual B12 tablet.

Have your doctors done any vitamin and mineral panels on you? Sores like that can be caused by vitamin deficencies. The B vitamins in particular. You could try supplementing with a stress level B + C combo.

There is a question in my mind as to whether the canker sores are actually caused by your celiac disease. Sounds like the doctors pinned it on celiac disease as there was laboratory evidence proving you were a Celiac. And having canker sores is in fact one of the documented medical conditions ass...

Antibodies can remain in your system for months to over a year....or go away within two weeks. It sounds like you were advised to go gluten free and that could have caused your TTG to decrease. Does your GI know you had been gluten free? Some folks with DH have no intestinal or it can be...