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Gnocchi (Gluten-Free)

This recipe comes to us from Paula Santos.

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1 kg (2 lb) cooked mashed potatoes
1 cup white rice flour
¾ cup potato starch
¼ cup corn starch
1 tablespoon margarine
1 tablespoon grated parmesan (optional)
2 eggs
salt

Mix all ingredients with hands. Knead lightly. Shape small portions of the dough into long snakes. On a floured surface, cut snakes into small pieces. Place a few gnocchi in salted boiling water. As the gnocchi rise to the top of the pot, remove them with a slotted spoon. Repeat until all are cooked. Cover with hot tomato sauce and serve. You can he re-heat them using a microwave oven.

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16 Responses:

 
Bonnie
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said this on
18 Mar 2008 7:10:20 PM PDT
This is fabulous! It was wonderful to have traditional Italian food after many years! Thank You.

 
Traveling gal
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said this on
12 Apr 2008 2:46:27 PM PDT
Wow! Better than the gluten kind. These were definitely like my Italian family's - but much easier. They were really simple to make. After adding my notes I realized I forgot to add the corn starch. Also used left over garlic cheese mashed potatoes. YUM! After I ate all I could, I froze the rest. Can't wait to have them. Ate these with pesto but look forward to other sauces and in soup! Thanks you so much.

Have been craving gnocci and these hit the spot. Will try to roll them out for chicken and dumplings next time. This is a real keeper.

 
Carol
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said this on
19 Dec 2008 11:27:32 AM PDT
Sounds like my family's traditional recipe except for the flour. Last time I tried gluten-free flour, the gnocchi fell apart in the water. Someone told me I could and that I should add xanthan gum.

 
Carly
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said this on
04 Mar 2009 2:21:48 PM PDT
Oh wow! I just made these and cooked a few up for a test. They were so delicate and tasty, perfect in fact better than gluten ones......
The things I changed was to add 1 flat teaspoon of Xanthan gum and used almost a full cup (less half an inch) of brown rice flour instead of white, as I didn't have any on hand.

 
Jaquie
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said this on
15 Mar 2009 8:03:40 PM PDT
This recipe just ROCKS! Easy to make, lighter than the wheat version, and delicious.

 
Jason
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said this on
18 May 2009 7:51:35 AM PDT
These gnocchi are great! They even passed the test with my grandfather. A very traditional 'melt in your mouth' gnocchi.

The only problem is that the children at the table didn't like the 'mushy' texture. Does anyone have any ideas how I might be able to firm up the dish just a bit to make everyone happy?

 
Natalie
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said this on
22 Sep 2009 2:18:27 PM PDT
Cook them just a bit longer. You should wait until they puff up, not taking them out as soon as they float.

 
Nick Byrd
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said this on
02 Jun 2009 8:18:38 PM PDT
So I work at a gluten free restaurant and we occasionally make gnocchi and to keep them from falling apart we do add the xanthan gum, but we also take the freshly rolled gnocchi's and par fry them instead of the traditional boiling and when we put them in with sauce they reconstitute amazingly...good luck!

 
Mary
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said this on
26 Jul 2009 4:28:38 PM PDT
I read this recipe but had serious doubts that I could make it and it would taste like traditional gnocchi. What a delicious surprise! They are very light and taste better than the wheat version and are relatively easy to make. My husband and granddaughter (both are on gluten free diets) were very happy with the results. The cost to make them is nominal when compared to purchasing
gluten free pasta. I will definitely make these again.

 
Deb Armstrong
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said this on
14 Nov 2009 11:45:36 AM PDT
I used 6 large potatoes, same amount of flour, 1 tsp xanthan gum, 3 TBS butter, 3 eggs, 2 pinches of nutmeg, 1/4 - 1/2 grated Parmesan cheese, 2 tsp salt. Bake the potatoes, rice or mash when hot, then cool add everything but the flour and mix, then add the flour until dough is like play dough and roll out. These are the best they have turned out. I make a lot, freeze uncooked. To cook: place frozen into boiling salted water until they float.

 
BHalbert
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said this on
20 Jan 2010 12:45:33 PM PDT
Thank you....this works perfectly for my GF husband. The entire family thinks these are terrific!

 
Michelle
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said this on
14 Feb 2010 7:42:55 PM PDT
We made this dish tonight (and included the suggestions by Deb A. on Nov 14, 2009). I am so happy to have a way to eat my favorite pasta dish!!

We baked the potatoes, rather than boiled them. And, we cooked the gnocchi for an additional 2 minutes from when they floated to the top. The consistency was PERFECT! We felt like we were eating at our favorite authentic Italian restaurant.

Thank you so much for posting this recipe.

 
Janna
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said this on
27 Jul 2010 7:46:19 PM PDT
Amazing!! Even my husband loved them. I am so happy to find a recipe for gnocchi. One of our favorite dishes is gnocchi with fresh homemade pesto. Thank you for sharing. Now we can all indulge instead of me just watching my family enjoy!

 
Stephanie
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said this on
01 Oct 2010 4:51:58 PM PDT
I made this recipe tonight to rave reviews! My whole family loved them, and they were so much lighter than the wheat version. Instead of mixing the rice flour, potato starch, and corn starch, I used 2 c. King Arthur brand gluten free flour which is made up of rice flour, tapioca starch, potato starch, and whole grain brown rice flour. I also added a teaspoon of xanthan gum. Thank you so much for posting the recipe.

 
Nicole
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said this on
21 Dec 2010 6:58:41 PM PDT
I made this recipe as is. It tasted fabulous with red vodka sauce.

 
Jen
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said this on
05 Apr 2011 11:17:58 PM PDT
This recipe is AWESOME with Okanawan purple sweet potatoes instead of plain white potatoes. (They're also called purple yams and can be found at an Asian food store. They're high in fiber and antioxidants and have a gorgeous purple color.) If you can deal with eating gnocchi that's a non-traditional purple and slightly earthly and sweet, you'll love it.

Also, a different website recommended frying the gnocchi instead of boiling them. I have to admit, I"m not really fond of frying but it was SUPER good this way -- VERY rich! So that's another option, if you can deal with the extra calories.

YUM!




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Similarly, I've been vegetarian for 25+ years. A 2015 Nature study connecting emulsifiers with microbiome changes has me wondering about the processed foods that I ate in the past, and I wonder about the wisdom of eating as much seitan as I did. I mostly prefer my post-diagnosis diet since it forces me to consider every ingredient and to cook from scratch more.

LOL, that might put it into perspective if I explain it that way.

I am very interested in this too. My daughter tested negative for celiac, but has terrible primarily neurological symptoms. Because she tested positive for SIBO at the time and was having some GI symptoms, I was told it was just a Fodmap issue. I knew better and we have been gluten free for 2 years. Fast forward to this February. She had a SIBO recurrence that I treated at home with diet and herbal antibiotics because I couldn't get the insurance referral. She was doing great. Then stupid me brought in gluten containing chick feed for the new baby chicks we got. Feed dust everywhere. Total mess. Really, no GI symptoms (she was SIBO free by then)...but the neurological symptoms! my daughter couldn't walk for three days. Burning down one leg, nerve pain in the foot. Also heaviness of limbs, headache and fatigue. Better after three days. But unfortunately she had a TINY gluten exposure at that three day mark and had another severe reaction: loss of balance, loss of feeling in her back and arms, couldn't see for a few seconds, and three days of hand numbness, fatigue, concentration problems. Well, I actually contacted Dr. Hadjivassilou by email and he confirmed that the symptoms are consistent with gluten ataxia but any testing would require a gluten challenge. Even with these exposures, antibodies would not be high enough. His suggestion was maintain vigilance gluten free. I just saw my daughter's GI at U of C and she really only recognizes celiac disease and neurological complications of that. But my impression is that gluten ataxia is another branch in the autoimmune side of things (with celiac and DH being the other two). At this point, I know a diagnosis is important. But I don't know how to get there. We homeschool right now so I can give her time to heal when she is accidentally glutened, I can keep my home safe for her (ugh, that I didn't think of the chicken feed!) But at some point, she is going to be in college, needing to take exams, and totally incapacitated because of an exposure. And doctors state side that are worth seeing? Who is looking at gluten ataxia in the US?

Caro..............monitoring only the TSH to gauge thyroid function is what endo's do who don' t do a good job of managing thyroid disease. They should do the full panel and check the actual thyroid hormone numbers.........T3 and T4. The importance of the TSH comes second to hormone levels. In order to track how severely the thyroid is under attack, you need to track antibody levels.......not the TSH. I did not stay with endocrinologists because I found they did not do a very good job and found much greater help and results with a functional medicine MD. You should not have a goiter if your thyroid is functioning well and your TSH is "normal". Maybe they should do a full panel? Going gluten free can have a profound affect for the better on thyroid function and that is something that is becoming more and more accepted today. Ask most people with Celiac and thyroid disease and they will tell you that. My thyroid never functioned well or was under control under after I discovered I had Celiac and went gluten free. It was the only way I got my antibody numbers back down close to normal and they were around 1200 when it was diagnosed with Celiac. I was diagnosed with Hashi's long before the Celiac diagnosis. I am not sure Vitamin D has anything to do with thyroid antibodies but who knows? Maybe it does have an affect for the better. It is really hard to get Vitmain D levels up, depending on where you live. Mine are going up, slowly, even after 12 years gluten-free but I live in the Northeast in the US and we don't have sun levels like they do in the South. I take 5,000 IU daily and that is a safe level to take, believe it or not. I get no sun on my job so the large dose it is! Having Celiac Disease should not stop you from being able to travel, especially S. America. I travel, although I do agree that some countries might be very difficult to be gluten free in. You can be a foodie and travel with Celiac so no worries on that front. You may not be able to sample from someone else's plate, unless they are eating gluten-free too but I have had awesome experiences with food when traveling so you can too!

I don't know what you drank or where.... so here are a few thoughts. - sure, a dive bar might have dirty glasses and serve a cocktail in a beer glass? But a nice reminder place, with a dishwasher, should be fine. If it's a sketchy place, Stick to wine, then it's served in wine glasses that aren't used for beer or bottled ciders in the bottle. - ciders on tap might, just a slight chance, have an issue. Because of beer on tap, mixed up lines, etc. - you may have a problem with alcohol - you may have issues with The high sugar content of the drink. I know I have similar issues if I drink serveral ciders of extra sugary brands - are you positive it was a gluten-free drink? Not this " redds Apple" pretending to be a cider - it's beer with apple flavor. Or one of those " gluten removed " beers?