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Woman with Celiac Disease Symptom-Free 15 Months after Reintroducing Gluten

Celiac.com 02/09/2006 - Do not try this at home. If you have celiac disease you need to remain on a gluten-free diet. This particular study, as indicated below, involved only one person--which is far too small of a sample to draw any solid conclusions from. It does, however, offer some hope that there may be other unknown factors that cause this disease--perhaps factors that can be reversed or kept in check. Many more studies will be needed to determine this. After reading and publishing much of Roy Jamrons work, we thought his comments on this study were very interesting and have reproduced them here.

Comments by Roy Jamron:
This is interesting, a case of reintroducing gluten to a celiac woman after a 10 year gluten-free diet with no symptoms of celiac disease showing up during a 15 month follow up study. It would be interesting if she remains symptom free in subsequent years.

It does bring up the idea of a gluten-ingesting bacteria link which I proposed in my article, Are Commensal Bacteria with a Taste for Gluten the Missing Link in the Pathogenesis of Celiac Disease?. In that article I proposed that a bacteria capable of transporting and internalizing gluten peptides resistant to breakdown could initiate a T cell immune response to gluten. Antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells) might present gluten peptides internalized by the bacteria along with peptides and chemical signals from the bacteria to T cells. The T cells would not be able to distinguish the gluten peptides from the bacteria peptides and would, therefore, initiate an immune response to gluten peptides as though they were components from pathogenic bacteria. The presence or non-presence of such a bacteria in twins offered an explanation as to why one identical twin could develop celiac disease and not the other.

After 10 years on a gluten-free diet, it is possible that the numbers of such gluten-ingesting bacteria might diminish to a level too few to initiate a gluten immune response, especially if the bacteria largely depend on gluten for nutrition. So, like the twin who does not develop celiac disease, she remains symptom free.

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I urged researchers to look for such gluten-ingesting bacteria in my article, and I continue to urge such research. Such bacteria could be found through the use of immunogold electron microscopy. This technique permits gluten peptides to be bound to and labeled with gold particles which show up as distinct opaque spots under the electron microscope. Such spots found within microscopic cross sections of fecal bacteria samples would identify gluten-ingesting bacteria.

Abstract of Study:

An Attempt of Specific Desensitizing Treatment with Gliadin in Celiac Disease
Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2005 Oct-Dec;18(4):709-14.

Gluten-free diet is the current treatment of celiac disease. We decided to verify the occurrence of histological and serological modification and/or clinical manifestations during a gradual and progressive introduction of gliadin in the diet and if it may induce a tolerance to food, as it occurs in allergic patients. We studied the case of a celiac woman with complete clinical and histological remittance after 10 years of gluten free diet. She took increasing daily doses of gliadin, reaching the final dose of 9 g of gliadin (15 g of gluten) in 6 months. Then she started a free dietary regimen. During the 15-month follow-up period esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy showed normal Kerckring folds and villi. Anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue-transglutaminase antibodies, as well as the haematological and biochemical parameters remained normal. Our results represent a new approach in research concerning celiac disease, and could provide a future line of study for its management.

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1 Response:

 
Brenda Lee

said this on
04 Jul 2008 7:02:45 AM PDT
I was gluten intolerant as a child, I was in several hospitals because no one knew what was wrong with me. I had low birth weight and was malnourished--as a child I weighed 16lbs at 4yrs old. Finally at Winston Salem N.C they found the problem. I was on a restricted diet until about 12 or 14 then ate pretty much anything I wanted for more than 20 years, then at 49 I began having severe abdominal pain and am back on the gluten free diet again. My point is I ate regular food for many years and to my knowledge I have no intestinal damage from this, I am having joint pain and stiffness, maybe osterporisis or arthritis.




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MelissaNZ, Has your daughter been checked for vitamin deficiencies??? Vitamin D deficiency symptoms include urinary incontinence, oral candidiasis (thrush), skin rashes, bumps on the backs of arms, joint pain, distended stomach and short stature. Bones can't grow much without vitamin D. Vitamin D deficiency causes delayed gastric emptying (food doesn't move through the gastrointestinal tract at a normal speed and the intestines bloat) which explains your daughter's delayed reaction to the cake. Vitamin A deficiency is also a cause of bumps on the back of the arms. Vitamin A deficiency causes vision problems. Vitamin A and D are both fat soluble vitamins. Absorption of fats is a problem for Celiacs. So is absorption of B vitamins and important minerals. B Complex vitamins are water soluble and must be replenished every day. Skin rashes are associated with several B vitamins like niacin (B3), B12, and thiamine (B1). I went through a period of severe malnutrition prior to diagnosis. It was not a pleasant experience. I had symptoms similar to your daughter's, including the incontinence, which resolved on vitamin D supplementation. Please, please have your daughter tested for vitamin D deficiency. And have her B vitamins checked as well. Celiac Disease causes malabsorption. Malabsorption causes deficiency diseases. Newly diagnosed Celiacs need to be checked for deficiencies. I hope this helps.

I will try to make my long story short, I have been searching my whole life for a diagnosis, I have seen pretty much every doctor possible I even went through a spinal tap recently because they thought I had multiple sclerosis, when I was younger I was always throwing up and having stomach problems, a couple hospital visits they thought I had appendicitis, I started having a neurological symptoms as well as anxiety and depression, The fatigue was just over bearing, I was having numbness and tingling and muscle spasms all the time eventually started having seizures, which kind of cycled through and stop happening after a couple months, and then it dawned upon me my brother has celiac pretty severely, my grandmother also has celiac, my dad does as well, I don't know why I never thought that it could be my issue, for the last week I have Been gluten-free and steering clear of cross-contamination, my dizziness is improved my fatigue is improved as well as rashes I was getting on my arms and sides, I have no more muscle jerks or spasms, The problem is I have horrible insurance and I cannot afford testing, so I am at least trying to do it an home blood test, I know it's not very accurate on telling me if I have celiac or not, But the thought I may never know for sure if I have it is very daunting. My family keeps telling me you don't need to spend thousands of dollars to have a doctor tell you you can't eat something you already know you can't. Just was wondering if anybody else has been in my position and seeing if anybody has a vi just was wondering if anybody else has been in my position and seeing if anybody has advice, I don't want to be known as one of those people who believe they have something and people with the disease frown upon them it's a very scary thing to think about.

...ON a side note this is quite easy, you can make your own out of any gluten-free Bread mix, I recently started using a coconut flour blend for this.......Most often people associate caraway with Rye Bread so you just add caraway seeds to the dough and a bit more vinegar to sour it a tad and BAM gluten-free Rye Bread knock off. I think Authentic Foods even has a additive to put in bread mixes to make it taste like Rye Bread....Or you can buy it preamade, I have issues with all the other ingredients but as for one of the best gluten-free Breads out the Canyon House makes a Rye like bread https://canyonglutenfree.com/buy-gluten-free-bread-products/Gluten-Free-Rye-Deli-Sandwich-Bread.html

Took me less than a minute, although why did they need our addy and phone?

As mentioned before you said she had rashes, have they checked if that is DH? That is a positive sign of celiac and those with the DH manifestation can have problems getting a postive with the gut biopsy. Here are some links. https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/dermatitis-herpetiformis/ https://www.gluten.org/resources/getting-started/dermatitus-herpetiformis/ Please read up on this. She can get the rash tested for the disease if it is DH.