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JCH13

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Head ache after eating

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JCH13

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Hi! My 19 year old daughter was diagnosed with Celiac Disease this past May.  She is completely gluten free and was feeling good until a cross contamination in November.  For the past three weeks she has been having headaches and they get worse after she eats.  She is so on top of her eating and we know it’s not caused by gluten.  Doctor said to take magnesium and vitamin B12 supplements but nothing is helping.  Has anyone had this issue or have suggestions? It breaks my heart she feels so yucky! 

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The headaches could be triggered by something in her diet besides gluten. Over time, celiacs commonly develop allergies/intolerances to other foods besides those containing gluten. This is because of damage to the mucosal lining of the small bowel which allows larger than normal protein fractions to cross into the blood stream. We call this "leaky gut syndrome."

Do the headaches happen after every meal?

Are the headaches migraine class?

Have you noticed any patterns with the headaches in regard to certain meals or foods your daughter is eating?

Does she generally eat the same things for say, breakfast or lunch? Keep in mind that allergic reactions can happen up to a day from the time the allergen was consumed. It would be good to keep a food diary until you discover potential triggers to avoid.

I might suggest you try a bland, simple diet centered around fresh meat and vegetables. Have her try a "low histamine" diet. You can look that up for more particulars but it would include avoiding things that are canned, pickled or aged/fermented. Many fruits and especially dried ones are typically high in histamines. I am a migraine suffer so I am speaking from some experience. "Fresh" is a key word here because essentially all foods increase in histamine content over time.

Has your daughter started taking any new vitamins/supplements/meds are started using shampoo or other topical beauty aids that might contain gluten? Some people are are really gluten sensitive and can get reactions transdermally.

Edited by trents

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Histamine as Trent's mentioned also popped in my head as a possibility. Trent's gave excellent details. 

Do not get overwhelmed initially with the inconsistency you may discover online for histamine lists. One can find differences regarding histamine lists. Most have to identify their particular triggers. As Trent's mentioned fermentation, old, overly ripe, aged etc is the avoid that is the initial start.

Good luck

 

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On 1/11/2021 at 12:22 AM, trents said:

The headaches could be triggered by something in her diet besides gluten. Over time, celiacs commonly develop allergies/intolerances to other foods besides those containing gluten. This is because of damage to the mucosal lining of the small bowel which allows larger than normal protein fractions to cross into the blood stream. We call this "leaky gut syndrome."

Do the headaches happen after every meal?

Are the headaches migraine class?

Have you noticed any patterns with the headaches in regard to certain meals or foods your daughter is eating?

Does she generally eat the same things for say, breakfast or lunch? Keep in mind that allergic reactions can happen up to a day from the time the allergen was consumed. It would be good to keep a food diary until you discover potential triggers to avoid.

I might suggest you try a bland, simple diet centered around fresh meat and vegetables. Have her try a "low histamine" diet. You can look that up for more particulars but it would include avoiding things that are canned, pickled or aged/fermented. Many fruits and especially dried ones are typically high in histamines. I am a migraine suffer so I am speaking from some experience. "Fresh" is a key word here because essentially all foods increase in histamine content over time.

Has your daughter started taking any new vitamins/supplements/meds are started using shampoo or other topical beauty aids that might contain gluten? Some people are are really gluten sensitive and can get reactions transdermally.

I agree. I have a bunch of auto immune diseases, (including Celiac and Type 1 Diabetes and Hashimotos and Reynauds and Sjogrens and NLD...) and recently learned I also have a mast cell activation syndrome with gi presentation. The mast cell episodes are usually triggered by histamines. The histamines in red wine, tomatoes and aged/jarred foods like roasted red peppers etc as well as dried fruits  would be triggers for my symptoms. Often symptoms from histamines would turn up between 3 and 4 am when histamine levels naturally rise during the night. ANYWAY, now that I am taking an antihistamine and some other mast cell stabilizing meds and avoiding the food triggers/(histamine rich food and drink) I am doing much better with these 4 am g.i. disasters. All this to say that you may want to take a look at histamine rich foods and see if they are symptom triggers. I had thought these symptoms I was having were because I was getting gluten-poisoned, but in fact my antibodies were perfect (b/c I am gluten-free!) despite ongoing episodes. It took months to figure out, but I am much healthier now that I avoid histamines. Hope you can figure out some triggers! 

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