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Lajet

Fruit/berries

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I'm reading Gluten-free for Dummies. ON page 62, in the gray box, it says that berries are the seed kernels and are not safe.

On page 63 it says that fruit (with no qualifications) are usually gluten-free.

Am I misreading page 62 - and they are talking about a different kind of berries than what we call fruit - strawberries, blueberries, raspberry, etc.

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I don't have the book, but are you sure it doesn't say wheat berries? Fruit is definitely gluten-free.

Thanks. That must be what they meant. It just says "berries", but it is in a section talking about "grasses, sprouted rains, berries and bran".

Thanks.

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Generally the berries contain tiny seeds but with some types of tropical fruit or tropical berries, the seeds can contain other compounds that are considered to be a hazzard and have some toxins. Cherimoya and those in the aannona family of fruits have seeds that should not be ingested as does loquat and some of teh sapotes. None of them have gluten though.

I'm reading Gluten-free for Dummies. ON page 62, in the gray box, it says that berries are the seed kernels and are not safe.

On page 63 it says that fruit (with no qualifications) are usually gluten-free.

Am I misreading page 62 - and they are talking about a different kind of berries than what we call fruit - strawberries, blueberries, raspberry, etc.

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Dear Lajet,

I have eaten blueberries, raspberries, and others with no ill effects. You will want to be careful though, because if you eat too many, they will hurt you. The seeds are hard to digest. They are wonderful additions to things this time of year! Enjoy them!

Dear kenlove,

I had no idea! I have never heard of those seeds being deadly! I suppose it is like the cyanide in the peach pits. You just never know! They really should put warnings on packages for those things!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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Hi,

A lot of the seeds in tropical fruit contain unusual chemicals as does the latex. Some latex like ofrm chico sapodilla fruit was where teh first chewing gum came from. The latex from fresh figs hower can cause a lot of skin irritations. I work with a lot of figs and have to be very careful not to get the latex on my arms which seems to cause blisters on top of the dh I sometimes get from being accidently glutened. Still, fig latex has a lot of uses. This is from a book by Julia Morton

-----

Latex: The latex contains caoutchouc (2.4%), resin, albumin, cerin, sugar and malic acid, rennin, proteolytic enzymes, diastase, esterase, lipase, catalase, and peroxidase. It is collected at its peak of activity in early morning, dried and powdered for use in coagulating milk to make cheese and junket. From it can be isolated the protein-digesting enzyme ficin which is used for tenderizing meat, rendering fat, and clarifying beverages.

In tropical America, the latex is often used for washing dishes, pots and pans. It was an ingredient in some of the early commercial detergents for household use but was abandoned after many reports of irritated or inflamed hands in housewives.

Medicinal Uses: The latex is widely applied on warts, skin ulcers and sores, and taken as a purgative and vermifuge, but with considerable risk. In Latin America, figs are much employed as folk remedies. A decoction of the fruits is gargled to relieve sore throat; figs boiled in milk are repeatedly packed against swollen gums; the fruits are much used as poultices on tumors and other abnormal growths. The leaf decoction is taken as a remedy for diabetes and calcifications in the kidneys and liver. Fresh and dried figs have long been appreciated for their laxative action.

--------

Some fruit have tannins in the skin which some people have a reaction too.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/index.html

lists a lot of tropical fruit -- mostly horticultural but it also lists the potential toxins.

take care

...

Dear kenlove,

I had no idea! I have never heard of those seeds being deadly! I suppose it is like the cyanide in the peach pits. You just never know! They really should put warnings on packages for those things!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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It's talking about wheat berries! My favorite bread before celiac was Alvarado street breads, especiall the flax and it was made with sprouted whole wheat berries. Whole wheat berries are used in a lot of breads and are thought to be the most nutritious part of wheat.

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Hi,

A lot of the seeds in tropical fruit contain unusual chemicals as does the latex. Some latex like ofrm chico sapodilla fruit was where teh first chewing gum came from. The latex from fresh figs hower can cause a lot of skin irritations. I work with a lot of figs and have to be very careful not to get the latex on my arms which seems to cause blisters on top of the dh I sometimes get from being accidently glutened. Still, fig latex has a lot of uses. This is from a book by Julia Morton

-----

Latex: The latex contains caoutchouc (2.4%), resin, albumin, cerin, sugar and malic acid, rennin, proteolytic enzymes, diastase, esterase, lipase, catalase, and peroxidase. It is collected at its peak of activity in early morning, dried and powdered for use in coagulating milk to make cheese and junket. From it can be isolated the protein-digesting enzyme ficin which is used for tenderizing meat, rendering fat, and clarifying beverages.

In tropical America, the latex is often used for washing dishes, pots and pans. It was an ingredient in some of the early commercial detergents for household use but was abandoned after many reports of irritated or inflamed hands in housewives.

Medicinal Uses: The latex is widely applied on warts, skin ulcers and sores, and taken as a purgative and vermifuge, but with considerable risk. In Latin America, figs are much employed as folk remedies. A decoction of the fruits is gargled to relieve sore throat; figs boiled in milk are repeatedly packed against swollen gums; the fruits are much used as poultices on tumors and other abnormal growths. The leaf decoction is taken as a remedy for diabetes and calcifications in the kidneys and liver. Fresh and dried figs have long been appreciated for their laxative action.

--------

Some fruit have tannins in the skin which some people have a reaction too.

http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/index.html

lists a lot of tropical fruit -- mostly horticultural but it also lists the potential toxins.

take care

Dear kenlove,

Thank you for the info! This is interesting! I never knew those things had latex. I will make sure my mother avoids them. She is allergic. That might explain her reaction to all berries. I am allergic to strawberries, but she seems to react to raspberries as well and some others.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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HI NoGluGirl

It really is amazing as to what is in some of the exotic tropical fruit when compared to the usual apples & oranges. Some fruit like abiu has a ton of antioxidants. We usually hear alot about the network marketed things like mangosteen juice or goji berries but there are other more sour fruit thats even better for us.

You just need to get to a tropical place like here in Hawaii to try them!

take care

ken

Dear kenlove,

Thank you for the info! This is interesting! I never knew those things had latex. I will make sure my mother avoids them. She is allergic. That might explain her reaction to all berries. I am allergic to strawberries, but she seems to react to raspberries as well and some others.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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Dear Ken,

Wow, thank you for the info! I have never heard of some of these things you have mentioned. It must be wonderful there in Hawaii. My cousin lives there with her family. She is in Honolulu.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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Hi NoGluGirl

I guess you'll have to visit your cousin one of these days and try some of the fruit. I live on the Big Island but go to Honolulu once a month or so. Most of the research I do for the university on tropical fruit revolves around horticulture and marketing. My job is really to help farmers make more moeny and become more sustainable. It wasnt until I got diagnosed last year that I started researching the nutritional values.

You can see some of the fruit I work with at http://www.hawaiifruit.net/V2posterweb.gif

which is a poster I made.

take care

ken

Dear Ken,

Wow, thank you for the info! I have never heard of some of these things you have mentioned. It must be wonderful there in Hawaii. My cousin lives there with her family. She is in Honolulu.

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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Dear Ken,

Thank you for the link! Who knew all of these things existed? I hope to be able to visit my cousin and her family there sometime. I know it is expensive to fly, but maybe if I win the lottery! ;) You never know! Then, I could afford a bunch of those different fruits, too! Your work sounds so fascinating!

Sincerely,

NoGluGirl

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