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LisaJ

Iceland

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Hello,

I was wondering if anyone has traveled to Iceland and how it was with the diet. My husband and I are looking to travel there next year, and am looking for any tips/advice. The trip we would like to take would take us far out of the main cities and staying at some farmhouses and B&B type places, so most of the time, I would not be near many restaurants - what is the "usual" for food there? (I have not done much research on this yet!)

Thanks a bunch!


Lisa

"The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page" -St. Augustine

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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Hello,

I was wondering if anyone has traveled to Iceland and how it was with the diet. My husband and I are looking to travel there next year, and am looking for any tips/advice. The trip we would like to take would take us far out of the main cities and staying at some farmhouses and B&B type places, so most of the time, I would not be near many restaurants - what is the "usual" for food there? (I have not done much research on this yet!)

Thanks a bunch!

I havent traveled there but I know fish is a huge part of their meals. You shouldnt be too far out from the main cities even be in the outlying areas since most of the country is covered by glaciers and its just a big road in a circle mainly with towns along the main road :) I hope you have a wonderful time and enjoy the lovely puffins that live there :D

From the coeliac website-

The Icelandic Coeliac Society advises contacting them before and after arrival. They can provide a list of gluten-free foods, as well as local information on where to eat, and where gluten-free food is on sale.

Samtok Folks meo Glutenopol

Fannafold 231

112 Reykjavik

Iceland

Telephone: +354 860 3328

Fax: +354 560 3350

E-mail

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I am also looking to travel there. Was supposed to be next spring, but now it looks like I'll be postponing it for another year. Please give an update if you go.


Positive Bloodwork 7/8/05

Inconclusive Biopsy 7/20/05

gluten-free since 7/23/05

Never felt better.

"So here's us, on the raggedy edge, come a day when there won't be room for naughty men like us to slip about at all. - Malcolm Reynolds"

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Hello,

I was wondering if anyone has traveled to Iceland and how it was with the diet. My husband and I are looking to travel there next year, and am looking for any tips/advice. The trip we would like to take would take us far out of the main cities and staying at some farmhouses and B&B type places, so most of the time, I would not be near many restaurants - what is the "usual" for food there? (I have not done much research on this yet!)

Thanks a bunch!

HI

I spent three weeks in Iceland summer before last, about 4 months after I was first diagnosed with Celiac's. A year and a half later, I can still say that Iceland is probably the most gluten-friendly place I have been (and I travel a lot). A spent a few days in Reykjavik and most of my time at the resort near Geysir.

As for food: for breakfast I generally got by with the local variety of yogurt (skirmir of something like that), tomatoes, pickled fish cheese and some kind of pickled fish. I was working and spent most days on a site 100 km north of Gullfoss so I had to come up with my on lunches. This was a combination of stuff I brought with me (I am a huge fan of fresh energy bars from the fresh energy bakery in reno, nv). and a few things I bought in Rekjavik. There is a health food store close to downtown Reykjavik. As I recally if you follow the main drag from the main square in front of the Town hall etc. toward the big cathedral, the health food store is just a couple of blocks from the town square. Sorry, I can't recall the address; I tend to wander till I find things.

For dinner, the restaurant at Geysir was very knowledgeable on Celiac's they even had gluten free bread though I don't know if they normally carry it or brought it in for me (I was there about two weeks). I ate a lot of fish and lamb; pretty much alternating between those two things. That was true pretty much eveywhere I went in Iceland.

Almost everyone I met in Iceland spoke English extremely well. They have a saying that if you don't travel you are not educated and Icelanders tend to place education in high regard.

Have fun; I wish I were there.

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