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huevo_no_bueno

I Can't Have Egg Replacer--what Substitute For Rise?

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I can't have eggs, and turns out I can't have En-r-G egg replacer without getting a headache and a stomachache. I think it is the potato starch and tapioca starch in it.

I know about egg substitutes for binding baked goods, such as milled flax. I'm sensitive to soy and didn't like the texture of tofu when I tried it in baked goods.

How much baking powder and how much baking soda per cup of gluten free flour can I use to get rise without negatively affecting taste?

Thanks!


Positive IgA-gluten in 2004

Positive IgG-gluten in 2008

Gluten intolerance

Egg allergy

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It would depend on what you are making.

The eggs not only provide some "rise" but mostly they provide binding as their proteins cook and become rubbery, like gluten would have. So you may end up doing quite a bit of experimenting to see what kind of things you can use for egg replacer (gelatin, xanthan gum, fruit puree, pumpkin puree, flaxseed soaked in boiled water to make a gel, etc. I'm assuming you don't do dairy, I may be wrong, some people do use gluten-free yogurt and that works also.)

If you use baking soda you should also use apple cider vinegar to activate it. Mix all the dry ingredients together and add the vinegar with the wet ingredients to it, and bake soon afterwards.

There is no hard and fast rule about "how much", it depends on the recipe, whether it is a pancake, loaf pan of bread, or a muffin or cake. For a pancake I've used about 1/4 teaspoon soda and a teaspoon vinegar, for a cake it's varied, maybe a teaspoon to a teaspoon and a half to 2 teaspoons of baking soda for about 1 and and 1 and 1/4, to 1.5 cups of gluten-free flour, and any where from one to three teaspoons of the apple cider vinegar.

I don't use baking powder anymore so I have no idea what that stuff does.

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Thanks for the help. I didn't know about using pumpkin--I dislike the taste of bananas so I'll have to give pumpkin a try. I do eat dairy; I eat from all food groups other than gluten and eggs.

I'm wondering how many other people can't have eggs here. I wasn't crazy about the Carol Fenster egg-free recipes with soy. Everything I've made with xanthan gum seems to hold together just fine, it is just as dense as foam rubber. I miss the large air bubbles of true wheat breads. Everything winds up like pound cake. I guess that's life?

It would depend on what you are making.

The eggs not only provide some "rise" but mostly they provide binding as their proteins cook and become rubbery, like gluten would have. So you may end up doing quite a bit of experimenting to see what kind of things you can use for egg replacer (gelatin, xanthan gum, fruit puree, pumpkin puree, flaxseed soaked in boiled water to make a gel, etc. I'm assuming you don't do dairy, I may be wrong, some people do use gluten-free yogurt and that works also.)

If you use baking soda you should also use apple cider vinegar to activate it. Mix all the dry ingredients together and add the vinegar with the wet ingredients to it, and bake soon afterwards.

There is no hard and fast rule about "how much", it depends on the recipe, whether it is a pancake, loaf pan of bread, or a muffin or cake. For a pancake I've used about 1/4 teaspoon soda and a teaspoon vinegar, for a cake it's varied, maybe a teaspoon to a teaspoon and a half to 2 teaspoons of baking soda for about 1 and and 1 and 1/4, to 1.5 cups of gluten-free flour, and any where from one to three teaspoons of the apple cider vinegar.

I don't use baking powder anymore so I have no idea what that stuff does.


Positive IgA-gluten in 2004

Positive IgG-gluten in 2008

Gluten intolerance

Egg allergy

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