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minivanmama0300

Does Neg Test, But Dq2 Gene Mean You Must Be Gf?

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I am so amazed! I received my dd's Enterolab results in the email just now. Here they are:

Gluten Sensitivity Stool Test

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 8 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Autoimmune Reaction to Tissue Transglutaminase

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 9 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Cow's Milk Protein Sensitivity

Fecal anti-casein IgA antibody 13 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Stool Test for Intestinal Fat Malabsorption

Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: 18 Units (Normal Range < 300 Units)

Gene Test for Gluten Sensitivity

Molecular analysis: HLA-DQB1*0201, 0503

So I think that sounds pretty good, she is in the normal range for everything. The gene part confuses me. I know I have seen others explain the genes, Are these the celiac genes? Where do I go from here? Her symptoms are not near as bad lately, and she is under 2 years old. I wonder if the worst of her symptoms were due to some outside thing, like a virus. Anyway, If she has one of the genes, what do I do? Go gluten-free? Keep that in mind and watch her and look for an onset? Please advise!!!!

Jess

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PLEASE SOMEONE!!

My dd's tests from enterolab came back negative, but she does have the 201 and the 503 gene. The 201 as I understand is the main celiac gene? Correct me if I am wrong. What does this mean? Should she be gluten-free even if she is no longer having any symptoms or problems, and if she is negative everywhere else? What should we do next? She did have a dairy sensitivity which didn't surprise me. I am thinking of checking for other allergies when we have our next appointment.

Jess

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I am by no means an expert, but I would say that she does not need to be gluten free at this point. She has the gene, so she could develop celiac disease later in life. If you've had her on a gluten-free diet, I would put her back on gluten and see what happens.

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Hi Jess:

When you received the email with test results from Enterolab, how did Elab interpret those results? They usually print an interpretation and recommendations just below the test results. From the numbers you posted, your daughter's results for everything EXCEPT casein (the milk protein) intolerance. That's not an allergy. It means she produces antibodies to casein just as celiacs produce antibodies to gluten. So I suspect Elab recommended that she avoid all dairy, not just lactose (the milk sugar), but only you know the recommendations from their email. Did she have other symptoms which made you want to test for celiac disease? Or do you have celiac disease? Sorry, but I missed the history before you ordered Elab tests.

BURDEE

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Thats the problem. There was NO INTERPRETATION at all!!! Nothing! I emailed Enterolab and have had no response. The whole thing just pisses me off. There was a small section detailing how to read the results, but not an actual interpretaion like I have seen on others reports posted here.

Well, she was having really bad GI symptoms, and what I thought were food allergy symptoms several months ago and thru a food journal we narrowed it down to bread products. Maybe it is a wheat allergy. Maybe not. She is fine now, no symptoms at all to speak of. So who knows, I guess we will stick with a regular diet. I sure regret wasting that money on Enterolab, I don't really feel like I got any where with that.

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There should have been an interpretation of the results included in the e-mail. It most likely is an error at their end, and the e-mail was sent before the interpretation was made. Below the Molecular Analysis for the genes it should also have listed the Serologic Equivalent (ie: DQ2, DQ3, DQ8, etc.). I would keep e-mailing them about it until you get the right response. Or better yet, call them. Then they have to talk to you directly and you can explain how upsetting htis is to you and how important it is for you to have an accurate report of the testing. I mean you paid around $400, right! You should get the whole report! Keep at them, I know they are a good lab and are very busy, but don't let them drop the ball. Keep tossing it at them until they give you the whole report!

I know that the first part of the genes your daughter has (HLA-DQB1*0201) is the DQ2 gene. I'm not sure about the other one. It is not one of the gene codes I recognise. If she has symptoms that improve on the gluten-free diet, then you could prevent her from ever getting celiac disease by keeping her on it. But if she is not on a gluten-free diet and her health is fine, then you can keep her on gluten and just have her blood tested periodically (every few years) to screen for the antibodies. Certainly have her tested again promptly if she develops worse symptoms. It is your call and you should go with whatever you feel is best for your daughter and your family. Only you can decide what that is.

God bless,

Mariann

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