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GlutenFreeManna

Sedimentation Rate-Westergren

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Okay so I posted before about a frustrating trip to a new dr in which it seemed like I had been tested for celiac against my will. I have been gluten free for over a year so the test results would inevitably come back negative. Today I got the list of blood tests that were actually run and the celiac test panel was NOT included. So I can breath a sigh of relief on that one. It seems the dr ignored my husband's insistance that I be tested and actually listened to me! So this new dr gets bonus points for that. Now on to my question--

One of the tests that was run was Sedimentation rate-Westergren. I googled this test and I see it is used to measure inflamation in the body for diagnosing autoimmune diseases like Lupus, RA, etc. I don't yet have the results I just know this test was run. My question is, should I expect this test to be negative/normal if I have been gluten free and celiac is my only problem?

I'm pretty sure that gluten causes inflamation in my body. When I consume gluten I get joint pain and muscle spasms and my hands shake. At the time I had blood drawn I was suffering a low level cc glutening. I didn't have joint pain but I had been very tired and we think we figured out the culprit was my husband kissing me after eating oatmeal. Anyway, if this test is positive or elevated or something does that indicate another autoimmune disease or can it be from celiac on a gluten free diet?

Anyone know much about this test? I wasn't sure where to post this question so mods please move if it's in the wrong place. Thanks.

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My sed rate was alarmingly high for several years after gluten free, despite all the DMARDS (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs) I was taking during that time. I used to wonder if it was gut inflammation that was making it so high, or what? As soon as I started on a TNF-inhibitor (Humira) it came tumbling down. so that answered that question. Inflammation can be caused by so many things; I am sure that is why he ran a battery of tests, including a check of your inflammation levels.

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My sed rate was alarmingly high for several years after gluten free, despite all the DMARDS (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs) I was taking during that time. I used to wonder if it was gut inflammation that was making it so high, or what? As soon as I started on a TNF-inhibitor (Humira) it came tumbling down. so that answered that question. Inflammation can be caused by so many things; I am sure that is why he ran a battery of tests, including a check of your inflammation levels.

Thank You Mushroom! So if it's high I won't be alarmed I guess. I had a positve ANA test a few years ago but they said it wasn't lupus after a follow up test. I know I have something auto-immune goign on. I'm hoping that it's only celiac. :)

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Thank You Mushroom! So if it's high I won't be alarmed I guess. I had a positve ANA test a few years ago but they said it wasn't lupus after a follow up test. I know I have something auto-immune goign on. I'm hoping that it's only celiac. :)

I think this area of medicine is still in its infancy. Westergren has it's own battery of tests (two antibodies need to be present in order to diagnose). I'm not sure about the overall sed rate and what that will tell you.

They are aware that celiac and other autoimmune diseases are connected, but they don't know HOW yet. Could be that a gene or genes are the source, or it could be that the gene triggers gluten intolerance which then triggers the other autoimmune diseases. They just don't know. Furthermore, they don't know if going on a gluten-free diet can change the course of these autoimmune diseases once triggered. It seems that some people experience an improvement of symptoms while others don't. Unfortunately, no one knows. So, chronic inflammation could be due to the gluten or any number of other things (including the ones you've been tested for). All we can do is hope for the best.

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This test is incredibly non-specific and does not diagnose anything. It's helpfulness is giving your physician an idea the level of inflammation, especially if you do have conditions like lupus. The destructive nature of Celiac Disease no doubt causes inflammation which may result in an elevated Sed rate, but so can a really bad stubbed toe.

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