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Sprouted Gluten-Containing Grains, by Donald D. Kasarda, Former Research Chemist for the United States Department of Agriculture

The following was written by Donald D. Kasarda who is a research chemist in the Crop Improvement and Utilization Research Unit of the United States Department of Agriculture. If you have any questions or comments regarding the piece, you can address them to Don at: kasarda@pw.usda.gov.

Most sprouted wheat still has gluten or gluten

of another and are usually obtained by partial hydrolysis of protein.'); return false">peptides remaining. Although the sprouting begins enzymatic action that starts to break down the gluten (a storage protein for the plant) into peptides and even amino acids. Generally this is not a complete process for sprouts used in foods so some active peptides (active in celiac disease) remain.

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1 Response:

 
sophia dalle
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said this on
01 Mar 2009 5:08:24 PM PST
Thank you kindly for the above information on the status of sprouted wheat. I am a longtime vegan and was born with celiac disease. This question has plagued me, but now I know to stay away from sprouted wheat.




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