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  • Scott Adams

    Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet

    Scott Adams
    1 1
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    • Rice and soy beverages because their production process may utilize barley enzymes.
    • Bad advice from health food store employees (i.e., that spelt and/or kamut is/are safe for celiacs).
    • Cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains (usually via the scoops).
    • Wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter, etc.
    • Lotions, creams and cosmetics (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis).
    • Toothpaste and mouthwash.
    • Medicines: many contain gluten.
    • Cereals: most contain malt flavoring, or some other non-gluten-free ingredient.
    • Some brands of rice paper.
    • Sauce mixes and sauces (soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc.).
    • Ice cream.
    • Packet & canned soups.
    • Dried meals and gravy mixes.
    • Laxatives.
    • Grilled restaurant food - gluten contaminated grill.
    • Fried restaurant foods - gluten contaminated grease.
    • Ground spices - wheat flour is sometimes used to prevent clumping.

    Edited by Scott Adams

    1 1

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    Diagnosed June '07, 3-month testing for anemia & celiac marker showed marked improvement. I'd been drinking Rice Milk for this past week & used up the end for gluten-free pancakes yesterday. I knew I'd been getting sicker again, but couldn't pinpoint the culprit. Saw this article last night, shocked to see Rice Milk at the top. Sure enough, when I retrieved the carton from the garbage, it was stated at the end of ingredients! I'd been so diligent all summer, how did I miss it? Just proves you should never let down your guard. I read labels throughout the grocery store, but how this got by my scrutiny, I'll never know!

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    I have celiac disease and I am constantly worrying about different products, this is very helpful. I read labels and sometimes find it confusing. I have been on a gluten free diet since 2003. My celiac disease is called 'refractory,' but I manage. This site is very helpful...thanks.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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