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  • Scott Adams

    Celiac Disease Onset Changes Gut Microbiota in Children

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Gut microbiota in kids changes as they begin to develop celiac disease.


    Micropia, microbes museum, Amsterdam. Image: CC BY 2.0--Dmitry Eliuseev
    Caption: Micropia, microbes museum, Amsterdam. Image: CC BY 2.0--Dmitry Eliuseev

    Celiac.com 08/11/2020 - Research shows that people with celiac disease have an altered gut microbiota, compared with healthy control subjects. A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate the composition of the microbiota of children at celiac onset, and the connection between bacterial abundances and symptoms.

    The research team included Anna Rita Di Biase, Giovanni Marasco, Federico Ravaioli, Elton Dajti, Luigi Colecchia, Beatrice Righi, Virginia D'Amico, Davide Festi, Lorenzo Iughetti, and Antonio Colecchia. They are variously affiliated with the Pediatric Unit, Modena University Hospital, Modena, Italy; the Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Italy; and the Gastroenterology Unit of University Hospital Borgo Trento in Verona, Italy.



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    Celiac patients were consecutively enrolled at Pediatric Unit referring for suspected celiac disease. healthy control subjects were also included in the study. Stool and duodenal samples were collected and evaluated by HTF-Microbi.Array.

    The study team enrolled twenty-one celiac patients and 16 healthy control subjects. A total of twenty-three subjects were female (62%). Duodenal microbiota of celiac patients showed a dominance of Enterobacteriaceae and sub dominance of Bacteroidetes/Streptococcus, while stool microbiota showed a lower abundance of Bacteroides-Prevotella (p=0.013), Akkermansia (p=0.002) and Staphylococcaceae (p=0.001) in celiac patients compared to healthy controls. 

    Patients with abdominal pain showed an increased mean relative abundance of Bacillaceae and Enterobaeriaceae, while celiac patients with diarrhea had reduced mean relative abundance of Clostridium cl. XIVa, Akkermansia, with an increase in Bacillaceae, and Fusobacterium.

    The team's results show that children with celiac disease have different gut microbiota than healthy non-celiac control subjects, with imbalances in pro-inflammatory microbiota being tied to celiac symptoms. The team calls for further study of the exact connection between gut microbiota and early-onset and symptoms of celiac disease. Learning more about the changes to the gut microbiota of children as they develop celiac disease may offer new paths to diagnosis and treatment in the future.

    Read more at the J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2020 Jul 14

    Edited by Scott Adams

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    Scott,

    That is good research thanks for sharing.

    I have come across other research over the years that link a Dysbiosis to several health conditions.

    Is Celiac disease the next one?

    Here they are if it will help someone else.

    https://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-gut-bacteria-aging-20181115-story.html

    https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=168801

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27689204/

    https://www.hhmi.org/news/excessive-growth-bacteria-may-also-be-major-cause-stomach-ulcers

    I came across this earlier research about how bacteria could be the cause of the weight loss from gastric bypass doing research for a friend....but I didn't think he would listen...having decided to already have the surgery.

    Maybe somebody else will read it and be helped.

    I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

    Posterboy,

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    Guest Sheri Goddart

    Posted

    Unfortunately, celiac disease is more common during adolescence. That is, this is not a congenital pain, right? I got celiac disease at the age of 16 when I was very nervous. I went through a lot of research before I understood the reason for my poor health. Tell me, can celiac disease be cured with medication? Who faced this? I would be very grateful for your help !!!

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    On 8/13/2020 at 11:46 AM, Guest Sheri Goddart said:

    Unfortunately, celiac disease is more common during adolescence. That is, this is not a congenital pain, right? I got celiac disease at the age of 16 when I was very nervous. I went through a lot of research before I understood the reason for my poor health. Tell me, can celiac disease be cured with medication? Who faced this? I would be very grateful for your help !!!

    Sheri,

    No Celiac disease can not be cured with medicine yet at least.

    Keeping on the topic of Gut Microbiota and/or sepsis or Viruses triggering disease.  Taking a B-Complex might be helpful to  you.

    The combination of B1 (Thiamine) B2 (Riboflavin) and B3 (Niacin) has been studied to down regulate inflammation in animals.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30903555/

    You might also have got an Epstein Barr Virus aka EBV and best known for causing mononucleosis around age 16 might could of triggered your Celiac disease.

    Research has shown Celiac disease and EBV to be connected/associated conditions.

    Here is a couple links about it (EBV and its association with a  subsequent Celliac diagnosis)

    https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-04-epstein-barr-virus-linked-diseases.html

    https://www.doctoroz.com/article/secret-life-epstein-barr-virus

    I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

    Posterboy,

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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