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  • Jefferson Adams

    Elite Colleges Treat Gluten-free Students to Exclusive Eateries

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 07/13/2015 - Gluten-free students at two elite liberal arts colleges in suburban Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, are now able to enjoy exclusive gluten-free dining areas.

    Photo: CC--Montgomery County PlanningBoth Haverford College and Bryn Mawr College have created dedicated, exclusively gluten-free dining areas for their students with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, according to a report by Campus Reform.



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    Bryn Mawr opened their gluten-free dining area in 2013, and Haverford followed in 2014.

    The exclusive eating areas are the brainchild of Bernie Chung-Templeton, executive director of dining services at both schools.

    Each of the gluten-free dining areas has signage clearly warning students to refrain from bringing in food from outside, including the main school cafeteria.

    What do you think? Do students with celiac disease or gluten intolerance deserve dedicated, exclusively gluten-free dining options?

    Read more in Campus Reform.

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    Guest Susan Copeland

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    This is such good news. I hope that this concept takes off and spreads around the country to all colleges and universities. For those of us who must be gluten free a safe place to eat is not a luxury but a necessity. Thank you for sharing this article.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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