Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Is Gluten Consumption a Possible Cause of Skyrocketing Diabetes Rates?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Researchers stress urgent need to understand causes behind rising diabetes rates, look to diet, including gluten.


    Douglas D-558-2 Skyrocket tailpipe. Image: CC--Tim Evanson
    Caption: Douglas D-558-2 Skyrocket tailpipe. Image: CC--Tim Evanson

    Celiac.com 04/18/2019 - Cases of type 1 diabetes have been on the rise in western countries, which suggests an environmental role in the development of the disease. Still, after decades of study, researchers have yet to nail down the factors driving the increase, and so they have no clear way to prevent new cases.

    A potential association that deserves closer scrutiny is one of environmental causes as a driver of diabetes, including dietary factors, such as gluten. At the moment, there is a great deal of focus on maternal and childhood dietary factors. 



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    To remedy the current impasse, researchers Maija E Miettinen and Suvi M Virtanen of the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Helsinki, Finland, cite the need for comprehensive prospective studies with carefully collected data to define and confirm associations. Only with such data can effective solutions be devised and tested.

    In a linked article, also in the BMJ, Antvorskov and colleagues investigated the association between maternal gluten intake during pregnancy and risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring. 

    The authors analyzed data from the large Danish National Birth Cohort, covering about a third of all pregnancies in Denmark during the recruitment period of 1996-2002, in which more than 70,000 pregnant women reported their diet with a food frequency questionnaire.

    That analysis revealed that risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring increased proportionally with maternal gluten intake during pregnancy per 10 grams per day increase of gluten. 

    Compared to women with the lowest gluten intake of under 7 grams per day, those with the highest gluten intake, who consumed 20 or more grams a day, had double the risk for type 1 diabetes development in their children.  Basically, higher gluten intake during pregnancy meant higher diabetes risk for the children.

    However, that’s one study with good data. The authors stress the urgency to understand what is driving alarmingly fast-rising diabetes rates. People’s health, well-being, and lives are at stake. For that, further study is needed, and soon.

    Read more at BMJ 2018; 362 

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are so many variables in this type of study that it's a thin line to draw such a conclusion.  I'd like to see this approach expanded to include countries with a diet heavier on pastas and the like.  Bread has been a staple in diets in many countries throughout history, so it would seem unusual to see a rise in diabetes due to gluten ingestion. 

    My understanding is that a slice of bread has approximately 5 grams of gluten.  Depending on where/how you were raised and at what time period you might have had toast with breakfast, a sandwich at lunch, and rolls with dinner.  That's a lot of gluten. 

    A historical look would be very helpful in seeing a correlation, perhaps, of our adult/elderly population and diets on which they were reared.  It certainly makes me curious.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    1 hour ago, Ging said:

    There are so many variables in this type of study that it's a thin line to draw such a conclusion.  I'd like to see this approach expanded to include countries with a diet heavier on pastas and the like.  Bread has been a staple in diets in many countries throughout history, so it would seem unusual to see a rise in diabetes due to gluten ingestion. 

    My understanding is that a slice of bread has approximately 5 grams of gluten.  Depending on where/how you were raised and at what time period you might have had toast with breakfast, a sandwich at lunch, and rolls with dinner.  That's a lot of gluten. 

    A historical look would be very helpful in seeing a correlation, perhaps, of our adult/elderly population and diets on which they were reared.  It certainly makes me curious.

    Hi Ging. Although I agree it's too little to draw such a conclusion that gluten is the cause, to be fair, the article/study doesn't draw that conclusion. For example, if you click on the BMJ link, the title of the article is "A potential association that deserves closer scrutiny". Given the correlation found, I certainly agree with that and it raises my curiosity too!  Also, bread has not been a staple in diets throughout history.  In general, grains like wheat have only been part of human diets for about 10,000 years. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/22/2017 - Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease (celiac disease) are autoimmune diseases that share similar genetic patterns. T1DM treatment is based on diet, physical activity and insulin therapy, whereas celiac disease treatment is based on a gluten-free diet.
    A research team recently set out to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) of individuals with the association of T1DM and celiac disease, to characterize their nutritional status and to compare it with those with only one disease and to healthier control subjects. The research team included JG Nunes-Silva, VS Nunes, RP Schwartz, S1 Mlss Trecco, D Evazian, ML Correa-Giannella...

    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.
    Celiac.com 07/27/2017 - It was five years ago when I launched the concept of "gluten is bad for us all!"
    Yes, you read that right - bad for you, bad for me, and bad for everyone else! This implies that the whole world should avoid gluten.
    This is a bold and an unrealistic statement to make. However, I thought that there was enough evidence about the harm of gluten for us to demand massive changes to everyone's diet, our farming practices and food manufacturing industry. Eventually, this could substantially improve the health of our Nations. However the practicalities of such a change would be very difficult overcome. Especially with the economic...

    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N
    Celiac.com 10/27/2017 - It has long been understood that two autoimmune diseases, celiac disease and type 1 diabetes are related. They share common genes and the incidence of celiac disease is higher among type 1 diabetics. There have been some anecdotal reports regarding children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes who were put on a gluten-free diet soon after their diagnosis and for a period of two years or more didn't require any insulin. The thought was that the gluten-free diet effectively halted the progression of the diabetes, at least for the duration of the study.
    Studies of mice have shown that despite utilizing a genetic strain of mice that were...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/19/2018 - Work to develop a vaccine for celiac disease could soon lead to a vaccine for diabetes.
    After successful phase 1 studies of Nexvax2, their peptide-based therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease, ImmusanT has seen a significant investment from venture philanthropy organization JDRF T1D. ImmusanT's peptide therapy program for celiac disease may provide lessons for a similar therapeutic treatment for Type 1 diabetes.
    The investment will support ImmusanT as it attempts to develop a vaccine to prevent Type 1 diabetes, based on the early success of its peptide immunotherapy program for celiac disease, the two entities announced...