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    Jen Cafferty

    Karo Corn Syrup is Gluten-free and Allergen-friendly

    Jen Cafferty


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Karo corn syrup is gluten-free.  There was some confusion about Karo since it contains caramel coloring.  A few of my readers were concerned about the coloring and here is what the manufacturer of Karo Syrup has to say.

    "All Karo Syrup products are free of gluten, soy, milk, egg, peanut and tree nuts. The syrup production facility does not contain ingredients with these allergens, so cross contamination is not an issue. While some caramel colorings do contain wheat products, the caramel coloring used in the dark corn syrup and brown sugar flavored corn syrup is gluten free.  The caramel coloring is derived from burnt sugar."



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    Try this recipe for Cranberry Glazed Pork Tenderloin or Turkey Breast

    Karo Corn Syrup is Gluten-free and Allergen-friendlyIngredients:
    1  Turkey Breast or Pork Tenderloin
    1 cup Karo Corn Syrup with real Brown Sugar
    1 bag (12 ounces) fresh or frozen cranberries
    1/4 cup sugar
    2 tablespoons orange juice concentrate
    2 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce
    1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
     

    Directions:
    Prepare and bake pork tenderloin or turkey breast according to package. 
    While the meat is baking, combine the remaining ingredients in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Simmer for 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occasionally.  Cool before serving.

    Spoon the glaze over the pork or turkey and serve warm.  This is delicious served with a baked sweet potato.

     


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    It might be gluten-free and soy free, but to say this is a product that should be in our cupboards when we are discussing health, is totally false. It is a known fact that sugar creates inflammation and inflammation creates disease. We can not substitute with products that move us toward other symptoms over time. Getting sugar out of our lives should be a priority.

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    A great many of us who are gluten sensitive are also sensitive to many other foods... corn in particular... It is disappointing every time I pick up a gluten free product in the store only to find it has corn in it. Must tell you a story about corn... I am more chemically sensitive than food sensitive. I'm told the first step in the processing of commercial corn is to soak it in a warm water solution containing sulfur dioxide to retard bacterial contamination while the corn is softened for its many potential uses... I get horrible chemical reactions from the sulfur in the corn that I don't get from organically processed corn.... The bottom line is that I find it disappointing to see a notoriously allergenic product pushed as a substitute for gluten...

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    A great many of us who are gluten sensitive are also sensitive to many other foods... corn in particular... It is disappointing every time I pick up a gluten free product in the store only to find it has corn in it. Must tell you a story about corn... I am more chemically sensitive than food sensitive. I'm told the first step in the processing of commercial corn is to soak it in a warm water solution containing sulfur dioxide to retard bacterial contamination while the corn is softened for its many potential uses... I get horrible chemical reactions from the sulfur in the corn that I don't get from organically processed corn.... The bottom line is that I find it disappointing to see a notoriously allergenic product pushed as a substitute for gluten...

    Who is pushing Karo as a gluten substitute? The author is just pointing out that it is gluten-free and can be used by those with celiac disease.

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    I'm glad to know that the coloring in Karo comes from burnt sugar. I am trying desperately to gain weight and I need all the calories I can get. This info was valuable for me. It may not suit everyone's needs but it suited mine. THANKS!

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    Who is pushing Karo as a gluten substitute? The author is just pointing out that it is gluten-free and can be used by those with celiac disease.

    Thanks Admin! I am definitely not promoting corn syrup as a healthy option for anyone. Personally I don't eat corn. But, there are many folks out there that use corn syrup and need to know that Karo is gluten-free. As Leigh commented, she uses it and was happy to have the information. I hope readers can understand that this site isn't just for promoting healthy eating but understanding what is safe on a gluten-free diet.

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  • About Me

    As the Founder of the Gluten Free Cooking Expo, Jen Cafferty works daily with people dealing with gluten intolerances. Jen is gluten-free and her two children and husband are also gluten-free. Providing classes and consulting to gluten-free clients in the Chicago area, Jen is an excellent resource for your gluten-free questions and concerns.

    For More Information: Visit the Gluten Free Cooking Expo's Blog for more quick and easy quinoa recipes. For more Thanksgiving recipes go to www.gfreelife.com and download the Gluten-Free Dairy-Free Thanksgiving E-Cookbook.

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