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  • Jefferson Adams

    Police Department Offers To 'Check Crystal Meth For Deadly Gluten'

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Cheeky police department offers to test meth for 'deadly gluten.'


    Image: CC--me5otron
    Caption: Image: CC--me5otron

    Celiac.com 06/09/2017 - More and more people are avoiding gluten these days, even folks who do not have a medical reason to do so.

    Perhaps looking to take advantage of the popularity of gluten-free dieting, or perhaps hoping their targets are easily fooled, one cheeky police department in California is offer to run a gluten check on people's meth.



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    The Newark Police Department posted the offer on their Facebook page. The offer reads: "Is your meth laced with deadly gluten? Not sure? Bring your meth down…and we will test it for you for free!"

    Of course, however bad may be, and meth is plenty bad, it likely contains no gluten. Also, gluten aside, anyone who takes the police up on the offer will likely be arrested, which seems to be the point.

    The post appeared on Thursday, and by Saturday, had been shared over 80,000 times, and received more than 14,000 'likes.'

    According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, over 12.3 million Americans age 12 and older have tried meth at least once.

    So far, no word from the Newark PD about whether their plan has actually found any gluten in meth, or led to any arrests.

    Read more at HuffingtonPost.uk.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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