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  • Jefferson Adams

    Shake Shack Now Offers BellyRite Foods Gluten-free Buns

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Burger chain Shake Shack now serves gluten-free buns. Photo: CC--Montgomery County Planning Commission.

    Celiac.com 01/12/2017 - Good gluten-free news for burger fans, especially those with celiac disease.

    Popular burger franchise Shake Shack has announced that they will be offering gluten-free buns in all locations, except stadiums and ballparks, for just $1 extra.



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    The company made the announcement via Twitter.

    We got gluten-free buns, hun! You can now snag your burger with a gluten-free bun at all Shacks 'cept stadiums & ballparks. pic.twitter.com/5ZtrCAlmJi

    — SHAKE SHACK (@shakeshack) December 19, 2016

    The buns are made by BellyRite Foods Inc., and taste similar to their Martin's potato rolls currently served on all Shake Shack burgers.

    So, if you're gluten-free and craving Shake Shack, you can jump in line with everyone else.

    This is just another example of popular restaurants trying to make their food available for gluten-free eaters.

    Been to Shake Shack? Tried a gluten-free bun? Let us know how it went.


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    So the buns will be made by a conventional baking company? Shared equipment or no? Chance of cross contamination? Based on the two times we tried to get bun-less burgers at a Shake Shack and the staff was COMPLETELY CLUELESS I'd say they need to do extensive employee training before they think of offering gluten-free buns or the buns will just an empty gesture.

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    I thought the same thing as the other commenter. The buns are pointless unless the staff has been trained to avoid cross-contamination and enforce it. I usually avoid places like this and Red Robin who claim to be gluten free but have no training in place.

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    Who cares! gluten-free restaurants are a dime a dozen. All I want to know is, is this a celiac safe gluten free restaurant? Will I get sick if I go there? Were you glutened after eating at Shake Shack and now have foggy brain? I hope you feel better soon and and expand on this article.

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    The Big Orange in Little Rock serves gluten-free buns by a local gluten-free bakery, Dempsey Bakery. It's nice to have a real sit down burger. I'd try the Shake Shake if the was one in the state.

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    Who cares! gluten-free restaurants are a dime a dozen. All I want to know is, is this a celiac safe gluten free restaurant? Will I get sick if I go there? Were you glutened after eating at Shake Shack and now have foggy brain? I hope you feel better soon and and expand on this article.

    I'm not sure why there is such cynicism when a major restaurant chain now offers a gluten-free option. Most celiacs are happy to hear about more choices.

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    To the admin, I think the point of the frustrated commenters is that we need more information in your article about whether the buns are made on separate equipment and whether Shake Shack is providing sufficient staff training before we can get excited about a new dining-out option.

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    To the admin, I think the point of the frustrated commenters is that we need more information in your article about whether the buns are made on separate equipment and whether Shake Shack is providing sufficient staff training before we can get excited about a new dining-out option.

    They buns used are legally gluten-free in the USA, feel free to contact the company for further details.

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    I think it's reasonable to trust that the buns, as delivered from the bakery, will be gluten-free. The bigger issue is whether the restaurant staff will understand how things need to be served to avoid cross-contamination. For those who are just eating gluten-free for fad reasons, it doesn't matter; for those who are celiac or otherwise medically need to eat gluten-free, it's crucial. It would be helpful to know what kind of training (if any) the staff is getting; places like Shake Shack tend to be high-turnover, low-wage places, so to trust them to do the right thing without explicit training is problematic, to put it mildly.

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    So the buns will be made by a conventional baking company? Shared equipment or no? Chance of cross contamination? Based on the two times we tried to get bun-less burgers at a Shake Shack and the staff was COMPLETELY CLUELESS I'd say they need to do extensive employee training before they think of offering gluten-free buns or the buns will just an empty gesture.

    Hi Mark, The gluten free buns served up at Shake Shack are actually made in a completely gluten free and allergen friendly facility by a company called Bellyrite Foods Inc. Their facility is a dedicated gluten free/allergen friendly facility.

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    So the buns will be made by a conventional baking company? Shared equipment or no? Chance of cross contamination? Based on the two times we tried to get bun-less burgers at a Shake Shack and the staff was COMPLETELY CLUELESS I'd say they need to do extensive employee training before they think of offering gluten-free buns or the buns will just an empty gesture.

    Bellyrite individually wraps every bun to prevent cross contamination for storing and shipping purposes, and to guarantee our product. Once the product leaves the Bellyrite facility it is then down to the company that is using the bun to ensure and inform its customers on how the bun is presented to the end user, and whether there could be cross contamination involved in their food preparation processes. Hope this helps!

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    Firstly thank you for spreading the celiac news, very much appreciate the hard work that you guys put in. Just wanted to point out that the gluten free buns at Shake Shack are not made by Martin's but by a new company called Bellyrite Foods Inc! Just want to keep you well informed and accurate!

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    Firstly thank you for spreading the celiac news, very much appreciate the hard work that you guys put in. Just wanted to point out that the gluten free buns at Shake Shack are not made by Martin's but by a new company called Bellyrite Foods Inc! Just want to keep you well informed and accurate!

    We updated this article...thank you!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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