No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

Gluten-Free Food Standards: You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby!

Celiac.com 08/17/2008 - People with celiac disease and others who rely upon gluten-free foods to maintain good health got some good news recently, when the Codex Alimentarius Commission the international body responsible for establishing food safety standards, adopted a single, clear standard for foods labeled as gluten-free.

Such a uniform standard will help people seeking gluten-free foods to make informed decisions about the foods they are buying. The standard will also allow Europe and North America to share a single standard, so that buyers can be confident that any foods labeled as ‘gluten-free’ from those countries will meet the Codex standard.

Things in the gluten-free world have not always been so progressive. Here’s a quick history of how the Codex standards for gluten-free foods have developed over the last three decades:

In 1981, the Codex Alimentarius Commission established the earliest standard for gluten-free foods. Under this original standard, foods could be labeled “gluten-free” if they were made from naturally gluten-free grains, such as corn or rice or from gluten grains (wheat, barley, rye) that had been rendered gluten free through processing. At the time, no reliable test existed for assessing the presence of gluten, and so tests gauged the levels of gluten by measuring levels of nitrogen.

This early standard permitted foods rendered gluten-free to contain no more than 500 milligrams of nitrogen per kilogram of grain. From the standpoint of those with celiac disease, this early standard was well meaning, but unreliable, and thus not particularly helpful for folks with celiac disease. The 1981 standard remained in effect until 1998, when the Codex Alimentarius Commission made revisions to the Codex standard and published the Draft Revised Standard for Gluten-Free Foods.

Ads by Google:

The 1998 standard was the first to rely on testing standards that could detect gluten levels, and thus, for the first time, established specific gluten levels for gluten-free foods. The 1998 standard called for foods produced from naturally gluten-free ingredients to contain 20 parts gluten per million, or less, while those rendered gluten-free, such as wheat starch, could contain no more than 200 parts per million gluten.

The 1998 standard remained in effect until the Commission met again in 2006, this time making an important reduction to the amount of gluten permitted in foods containing ingredients that have been rendered gluten-free through processing. According to the 2006 standard, foods made from naturally gluten-free grains could still contain 20 parts gluten per million or less, while foods made from ingredients rendered gluten-free through processing must contain 100 parts gluten per million or less.

In November 2007, the Codex Alimentarius Commission met again, and, among other things, changed the name of the standard from the Draft Revised Codex Standard for Gluten-Free Foods was “The Draft Revised Standard for Foods for Special Dietary Use for Persons Intolerant to Gluten.” The name change is significant because, for the first time, the standard reflects the special dietary needs of the gluten-free community, and thus seems to put the needs of the community ahead of special interests.

In the 2007 meeting, the Commission also established the latest draft standard calling for gluten-free foods to be made from naturally gluten-free ingredients and/or ingredients containing wheat, barley, rye, or crossbred varieties of these grains that have been specially processed to remove gluten, and to contain gluten levels of 20 parts per million or less. The biggest change made to the draft standards at the 2007 meeting is the addition a new category of foods called, foods “specially processed to reduce gluten to a level above 20 up to 100 milligrams per kilogram.”  This category includes foods, such as wheat starch and other starches, made from wheat, barley, rye, and hybrids of these grains processed to reduce gluten to between 20 up to 100 parts gluten per million.

In July 2008, the Codex Alimentarius Commission met again and officially adopted the 2007 official Codex standard. Although this new development has yet to appear on their website, here is the new standard:

2.1.1 Gluten-free foods

Gluten-free foods are dietary foods

a) consisting of or made only from one or more ingredients which do not contain wheat (i.e., all Triticum species, such as durum wheat, spelt, and kamut), rye, barley, oats1 or their crossbred varieties, and the gluten level does not exceed 20 mg/kg in total, based on the food as sold or distributed to the consumer,and/or

b) consisting of one or more ingredients from wheat (i.e., all Triticum species, such as durum wheat, spelt, and kamut), rye, barley, oats1 or their crossbred varieties, which have been specially processed to remove gluten, and the gluten level does not exceed 20 mg/kg in total, based on the food as sold or distributed to the consumer.

2.1.2 Foods specially processed to reduce gluten content to a level above 20 up to 100 mg/kg

These foods consist of one or more ingredients from wheat (i.e., all Triticum species, such as durum wheat,spelt, and kamut), rye, barley, oats1 or their crossbred varieties, which have been specially processed to reduce the gluten content to a level above 20 up to 100 mg/kg in total, based on the food as sold or distributed to the consumer.

Decisions on the marketing of products described in this section may be determined at the national level.


The Codex Alimentarius Commission will meet again in Rome from 29 June to 4 July 2009.

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



6 Responses:

 
Daria Spiak
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
01 Sep 2008 5:31:20 AM PDT
All your articles are great. They are very informative and keep the Celiac community apprised of new and important information for us.
Thank You very much.

 
Les Mitchell
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
01 Sep 2008 6:59:55 AM PDT
Sounds good to me.

 
Susie
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
01 Sep 2008 6:26:46 PM PDT
This might be good for some, but for me just one little speck of gluten, digested, inhaled or applied to the skin (i.e. lotions, shampoos) causes damage and illness for me. I personally think the labeling is overrated, after all, would they call an item sugar free if it still contained some form of sugar?

 
Anna
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingempty Unrated
said this on
08 Oct 2008 9:13:22 AM PDT
I agree with Susie. Likewise, I am very sensitive to gluten, even the smallest trace amounts. Hopefully something else can be done to ensure us that we won't have a reaction. I just stick to the basics: apples, green beans, rice, and select brands of chicken.

 
Lali
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Oct 2008 9:52:36 AM PDT
Thanks for the history and clarification on the issue.

 
curtis
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
11 Feb 2009 6:42:27 AM PDT
Thanks for this. I work at Whole Foods and this helps me with customer questions/concerns. People should also read up on Codex too. Some of it is pretty scary.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

Sorry for the very late reply and thanks for the replies, I didn't get a notification of any. In case anyone else comes across this and has been wondering the same as I was, I did try a vegetable broth and I did react to it in the same way as if I'd eaten the vegetables. As for the candida, I've been using coconut oil and am seeing a medical herbalist for this and leaky gut. It's only been a few weeks but I've noticed an improvement all round.

What did you drink and where did you drink it? NOTE if you drink something at a bar using their glasses your asking for trouble BEER IS EVERYWHERE in most bars and a CC hell. If it was at home and a non grain based liqour then I would be really concerned that it might just be alcohol. I personally can not really drink much of anything any more. I love rum, and I cook with it sometimes in sautes. I also have rum extract/butter rum extract/and rum emulsion I use in shakes, homemade keto pudding/ mixed into dishes. and even add some to drink to give it a rum flavor lol.

I can only think of two things, 1 something you put on your potato was contaminated like the butter container could have crumbs in it or something like that as mentioned before, and you could be having a reaction to dairy or what ever was put in it.......IF it was just plain potato and you reacted with bloating and cramping you might have a carb issues, tad rare and most associated with additional auto immune diseases but could be in which case a diet of fats and protein would be your answer much like it is for me now days. What all have you eaten in the privous 8 hours including beverages, condiments, spices and foods?

They are gluten-free. Did you use butter that might have gluten crumbs on it? For me , it takes more than 2 hours to feel the effect of gluten- maybe something you ate before? Maybe stomach virus?

Has anyone had an reaction to potatoes? Just made couple bake potatoes 2hrs ago and now I feel awful...just wondering thought potatoes were gluten free?????