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Late Diagnosis of Celiac Disease Increases Risk of Sepsis

Celiac.com 09/22/2008 - People diagnosed with celiac disease in adulthood face a slightly higher risk of developing a severe infection called pneumococcal sepsis, according to the results of a study published in the August issue of the journal Gut.

A Swedish research team led by Dr. Jonas F. Ludvigsson, of Orebro University Hospital, Sweden reviewed data gathered from the Swedish National Inpatient Register to assess the risk faced by people with celiac disease of developing sepsis. The researchers looked at 15,325 patients with a diagnosis of celiac disease, 14,494 inpatient reference subjects, and as many as five reference individuals per case from the general population.

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People diagnosed with celiac disease as adults developed sepsis at slightly higher levels than inpatient reference patients (HR = 1.5, p = 0.006). The elevated risk for sepsis was also seen when celiac disease patients were compared with reference subjects from the general population (HR = 2.6, p < 0.001). Celiac disease patients diagnosed in childhood showed a slightly elevated increased risk of sepsis when compared to the general population (HR = 1.8, p = 0.003).

According to Dr. Ludvigsson’s team, this elevated risk of developing pneumococcal sepsis faced by people with celiac disease might be due to a condition called hyposplenism, but the study’s small size, and it’s lack of data on spleen size made it impossible to make a firm conclusion as to the cause.

Gut 2008;57:1074-1080.

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As mentioned before you said she had rashes, have they checked if that is DH? That is a positive sign of celiac and those with the DH manifestation can have problems getting a postive with the gut biopsy. Here are some links. https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/dermatitis-herpetiformis/ https://www.gluten.org/resources/getting-started/dermatitus-herpetiformis/ Please read up on this. She can get the rash tested for the disease if it is DH.

Thanks for your reply. I will get her retested. She hasn't had any gluten for a year and is very good at not eating it, but had some cake that night. It's so hard because the Dr who did the biopsy said there wasn't any damage so she can't be classed as Coeliacs. She had ten samples taken, but yes, like you say the intestines are huge.

Thank you for your informative reply. Yes I think you are right in that she is still getting dome cross contamination exposure through chopping boards, condiments etc. I will get her bloods redone to see if her levels have dropped and do a gluten challenge again. We all are on a whole foods diet, buy not all Gluten-Free. I find extended family difficult as because she had a negative biopsy they don't believe she could still possibly have it and aren't so careful with her. Thank you for the links, all very helpful.

Why do you make it so freaking hard to sign up? It's easier to find a replacement for rye bread!

I don't know if there is a simple answer to your question but I try to use "choose my plate" as a guide for my meals. https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlate It basically suggests that when you sit down to a meal - 1/2 of your plate is fruits and veggies and the other 1/2 is dairy, carbs and protein. It's a really simple way to look at my meals and see if they are balanced enough. It also suggests getting very few calories in liquid form and avoiding snacking..... Good luck!