No popular authors found.
Ads by Google:

Categories

No categories found.


Get Celiac.com's E-Newsletter




Ads by Google:



Follow / Share


  FOLLOW US:
Twitter Facebook Google Plus Pinterest RSS Podcast Email  Get Email Alerts

SHARE:

Popular Articles

No popular articles found.
Celiac.com Sponsors:

How Much Vitamin D Should Infants Get to Possibly Prevent Celiac Disease?


The Endocrine Society 92nd Annual Meeting

Celiac.com 06/24/2010 - I have previously suggested vitamin D deficiency and the makeup of gut bacteria during pregnancy and infancy, while breast-feeding and prior to and during the introduction of gluten, may be factors leading to the onset of celiac disease. The question of how much vitamin D should be given to infants remains open. The current recommendation, by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is that children of all ages should receive 400 IU of vitamin D each day. A recent limited study of 74 diabetic children, however, suggests that this recommended dose may still be insufficient for most children. The children were given daily vitamin D doses ranging from 400 IU to 2000 IU over a 12-month period and their vitamin D status was monitored. Most of the children remained vitamin D insufficient or deficient at the end of the study. The study concluded that all children younger than 5 years should probably receive at least 1000 IU of vitamin D daily. Further study is needed, especially with specific emphasis on the onset and prevention of celiac disease during infancy.

Ads by Google:


Source:
Medscape Medical News - June 22, 2010: More Evidence That Current Pediatric Vitamin D Recommendation is Often Inadequate
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/723993

Celiac.com welcomes your comments below (registration is NOT required).





Spread The Word







Related Articles



2 Responses:

 
Rufus Greenbaum
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
02 Jul 2010 9:06:25 AM PDT
Look for the report by Dr Carol Wagner & Dr Bruce Hollis.
They ran a Class1 Randomised Control Trial where they supplemented pregnant women with 400IU, 4,000 IU and 6,400IU of Vitamin D3 per day.

Pregnacy was easier, birth was easier, babies were bigger and healthier and there were fewer complications

 
Seth Bittker
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
11 May 2015 6:15:58 AM PDT
There is an alternative view on this. If you look at the epidemiological data and the biochemistry it seems that large doses of oral vitamin D in youth could be involved in inducing celiac disease in later life in some. I have written a journal article on this. Here is the citation:

Exposure to excessive oral vitamin D in youth: a risk
factor for celiac disease in later life?
Journal of Allergy and Asthma (Herbert)
2015. Volume 2, Article 2.




Rate this article and leave a comment:
Rating: * Poor Excellent
Your Name *: Email (private) *:




In Celiac.com's Forum Now:

All Activity
Celiac.com Celiac Disease & Gluten-Free Diet Forum - All Activity

I have notice that I am sick much less often.

Thanks everyone. I appreciate the answers. I'm waiting to hear back from her dr and then we will go from there. If the dr doesn't think the results show anything then I will get a second opinion thanks to everything that has been shared on here. I will make sure and not change her diet for now. I am planning on getting tested myself, I have had suspicions since last summer that I could have it. I have a form of autoimmune arthritis, just unclear exactly what it is at this time. I going to ask to be tested for celiac at my next appt though.

I was diagnosed in 2002 and I think I have had maybe 2 actual colds since then. I figured the same as you that with my immune system not having to try and 'save' me from gluten that it now is able to fight off the occasional virus. The only thing it hasn't been able to fight off is shingles. Thankfully those are clearing and I blame myself for that with lack of sleep and a very poor diet for a bit. Lesson learned, one does not live off crackers and cheese alone.

Welcome to the board. I agree with the previous posters that you are very likely looking at celiac. Please do keep her on gluten until all celiac related testing is finsihed. After that do give the diet a good strict try even if the biopsies are negative. Also keep in mind that celiac is genetic so it would be a good idea to screen others in the family even if they don't seem to have symptoms.

@jddh So...did the restricted diet you were going to implement work (FODMAP or Whole Foods)? I recall that you were mis-diagnosed at one point with refractory celiac disease, but it was later determined that you were getting trace amounts of gluten in your diet. If you are not catching colds, I assume that you have healed from the damages of celiac disease? I hope so!!! ?