23142 Can Science Create Safe Wheat for People with Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity? - Celiac.com
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Can Science Create Safe Wheat for People with Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity?

Celiac.com 12/19/2012 - Can scientists create gluten-free wheat strains that are safe for people with celiac disease, and suitable for making bread? According to a team of researchers writing in the journal PNAS, the answer is 'yes.'

Photo: CC--Dag Endresen.Gluten is a complex mix of proteins stored in kernels of wheat, barley and rye. Some, but not all, of these proteins trigger the immune reactions seen in celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.

Scientists have already experimented with another method that involves sifting through various kinds of wheat and barley in search of types that contain little or no offensive gluten proteins in their grains.

So far, researchers have found wheat varieties that lack some of the important allergenic proteins, but they have yet to find a variety that is completely safe for people with celiac disease.

That fact led the research team led by Shanshan Wen of Washington State University in Pullman and colleagues, to try a new approach that focused on a key enzyme that helps to trigger a group of genes that produce the most reactive gluten proteins.

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To do this, they used a genetic engineering trick that eliminated the key enzyme altogether. The resulting seeds wheat kernels showed sharply lower levels of these reactive gluten proteins.

The research team predicts that, with more more tinkering, they will be able to create a line of wheat that completely eliminates the problem proteins, and keeps the non-problem proteins in the wheat.

According to their write-up, they feel that they have good odds of creating wheat that is safe for people with celiac disease, and suitable for producing good bread and baked goods.

If successful, they will then begin testing the results in cell cultures, mice and gluten-sensitive apes.

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7 Responses:

 
Ann Curtis
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said this on
24 Dec 2012 9:07:11 AM PDT
It would have been nice if the scientists would have left grains alone to begin with, and hadn't been tinkering with them for the past fifty years or so. If they'd just left all the "ancient" grains alone--they wouldn't now have to "find" a grain that celiacs and gluten-intolerant people can stomach.

Any time science tinkers with anything, it usually ends up that we pay a price for such tinkering.

 
vicki
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said this on
22 Sep 2013 6:13:17 PM PDT
Absolutely.

 
vicki
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said this on
22 Sep 2013 6:29:55 PM PDT
I meant that I absolutely agree with you that science needs to stop tinkering with our food. The original wheat did not have the kind of gluten that is in our GM wheat today. If certain changes can't possibly happen in nature naturally there is a good reason for it. Splicing genes into or out of a food cannot be good.

 
Diana
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said this on
24 Dec 2012 10:59:44 AM PDT
Extreme caution is urged related to the use of genetic engineering to manipulate our food. The science is not precise. The genetically engineered foods we are currently eating are a contributing factor to the rise in autoimmune disease. Long term independent peer reviewed testing must be conducted before we introduce any genetically engineered food into our environment and our food supply.

 
vicki
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said this on
22 Sep 2013 6:08:04 PM PDT
I absolutely agree with you. I've been experiencing all kinds of health problems lately including sudden arthritis pain in every joint in my body. I had some allergy testing done and found out that I'm allergic to wheat, corn and soy. Coincidence? I don't think so, these are all genetically engineered grains. I felt much better when I stopped eating these grains and the arthritis pain is 80% better, but now found out that I have an autoimmune disease - Sjogrens as well as gastroparesis.

 
Barb
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said this on
24 Dec 2012 8:11:28 PM PDT
I have high doubts I could eat it. Are they going to alter corn, rice and other grains that I get sick on? That does not remove the issue of cross contamination as well.

I have doubts about this. All grains have a type of gluten in them, and I can't eat any of them. Are they going to alter milk so I can drink it as well? Or tomatoes and other foods?

 
Sandy
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said this on
18 May 2013 8:59:29 AM PDT
My next question would be, what about all the pesticides that are being used? I have been reading some articles lately that suggest that we are being poisoned by them. I haven't been diagnosed with celiac disease yet, but I have several of the symptoms. I would like to believe I don't have it, but common sense and doing my homework says I probably do. I am so overwhelmed with this whole process. I now worry about how dangerous the pesticides are that are being sprayed on the fruits and vegetables we are consuming. I can't afford to buy organic products continuously. Gardening seems the best solution, but is a big undertaking if you want to be able to can enough foods for a whole family. This is just a lot to take in and requires much patience and educating. God bless the person responsible for trying to help the rest of us fit into a world where not having the knowledge and resources is making us unhealthy. I am thankful for finding this site.




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You may find these interesting, they're from Professor Marios Hadjivassiliou, a leading expert on gluten ataxia: http://www.acnr.co.uk/pdfs/volume2issue6/v2i6reviewart2.pdf Best of luck helping your daughter

Yep. The one that is most relevant I think is the post by Backtalk. Backtalk went back on gluten and have to a colostomy done on an emergency basis. Not fun. She regretted ignoring the gluten-free diet.

Welcome Lochella Hopefully you can draw some comfort from finally having an answer and thus starting the path to good health. Healing is going to come from your own body as you progress on the gluten free diet and it stops fighting itself and starts repairing that damage. You're still in the very early days and it's not an instant process sadly. 6 months is the usual figure bandied around for seeing significant improvement, although hopefully you'll get some signs of improvement much quicker than that. The single best thing you can do is to eat good simple whole foods and make sure absolutely no gluten gets into your diet. There's some tips here: With stomach pains peppermint tea is my go to drink. Avoiding caffeine seems to help as well as its rough on digestion at the best of times. This may be a time to ease up on alcohol as well and consider dropping dairy, many find they're lactose intolerant but this can correct itself in time. You will find lots of good info, advice and support here, I hope the community is of help to you as it was to me. Best of luck!

I recently got diagnosed with Celiac disease I must of had it my whole life. I'm 35 I've always had severe stomach problems, in and out of hospitals and misdiagnosed until now. My small intestine is severely damaged I'm now waiting to see a dietitian and my specialist wants to see me again in 2 weeks. How do some of you deal with the pain of the healing process and what helps you? I'm in so much pain?

I recently got diagnosed with Celiac disease I must of had it my whole life, in 35 I've always had severe stomach problems in and out of hospitals and misdiagnosed until now. My small intestine is severely damaged in now waiting to see a dietitian and my specialist wants to see me again in 2 weeks. How do some of you deal with the pain of the healing process and what helps you? I'm in so much pain?