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Does Antibiotic Exposure in Pregnancy Increase Risk of Celiac Disease in Offspring?

Celiac.com 08/27/2014 - Can antibiotic exposure in pregnancy increase the risk of celiac disease in children? Some researchers suspect that infant microbiota play a pathogenic role in celiac disease. The idea that antibiotic treatment in pregnancy could significantly impact the infant microbiota, and thus influence the development of celiac disease, has led many to ponder the possible connection.

Photo: CC--Kelly HunterTo get a clearer picture, a research team recently set out to study the effects on offspring of antibiotic exposure in pregnancy.

The team included Karl Mårild, Johnny Ludvigsson, Yolanda Sanz, and Jonas F. Ludvigsson. They are variously affiliated with the Deptartment of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, the Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital at Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Sweden, the Division of Paediatrics in the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at Linköping University, Östergötland County Council in Linköping, Sweden, the Department of Paediatrics of Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, and the Microbial Ecology and Nutrition Research Group at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology of the National Research Council (IATA-CSIC) in Valencia, Spain.

The team started by reviewing existing data on antibiotic exposure in pregnancy in 8,729 children recorded in the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort study. Through December 2006, 46 of the 8,729 had developed celiac disease. The team then used Cox regression to estimate celiac disease hazard ratios (HRs) in children whose mothers received antibiotics during pregnancy. The ratios were adjusted based on parent-reported diary data on breastfeeding, age at gluten introduction, and the number of infections in the child's first year of life.

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Of the 1,836 children exposed to antibiotics during pregnancy, 12 (0.7%) children developed celiac disease as compared with 34/6893 (0.5%) unexposed children (HR = 1.33; 95% CI = 0.69–2.56).

Risk estimates remained unchanged after adjustment for breastfeeding, age at gluten introduction and infection load in the child's first year of life (HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 0.66–2.48).

When all the data were factored, the team found no statistically significant connection between antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and celiac disease in offspring. The team suggests that this data may present an accurate picture, or it may be that they simply lack the statistical power to make a clear connection.

Further studies are likely needed before researchers can confidently conclude that there is no connection between antibiotic exposure in pregnancy and celiac disease in offspring.

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4 Responses:

 
Lsai
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
31 Aug 2014 12:53:15 AM PDT
Celiac Disease isn't something you catch. It isn't something you develop. Celiac disease is a GENETIC MUTATION! If you have the genes for deliac disease YOU HAVE IT. PERIOD! If you do not have the genes for Celiac Disease YOU DO NOT HAVE IT. PERIOD! Very ferkin simple. Antibiotics don't cause it, vaccinations don't cause it, smog doesn't cause it. YOUR GENES CAUSE IT!!! Stop wasting money researching what causes this when we know what causes it GENETICS. Use the research money wisely and find a way to treat us!

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
01 Sep 2014 4:38:38 PM PDT
You are mistaken. Having the genetic markers for it does not mean that you will have celiac disease. Over 20% of the population in the USA have the generic markers for celiac disease, yet only around 1% have it.

 
Justin
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said this on
01 Sep 2014 7:49:54 AM PDT
Infants are born with a sterile gut, an all GI flora are acquired through environmental exposure. It wouldn't make sense that antibiotic exposure in utero would have any bearing on the subsequent acquisition of gut flora.

 
Antoinette
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said this on
01 Sep 2014 11:33:51 AM PDT
Very interesting. Hope to read more about it in the future.




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Sorry for the very late reply and thanks for the replies, I didn't get a notification of any. In case anyone else comes across this and has been wondering the same as I was, I did try a vegetable broth and I did react to it in the same way as if I'd eaten the vegetables. As for the candida, I've been using coconut oil and am seeing a medical herbalist for this and leaky gut. It's only been a few weeks but I've noticed an improvement all round.

What did you drink and where did you drink it? NOTE if you drink something at a bar using their glasses your asking for trouble BEER IS EVERYWHERE in most bars and a CC hell. If it was at home and a non grain based liqour then I would be really concerned that it might just be alcohol. I personally can not really drink much of anything any more. I love rum, and I cook with it sometimes in sautes. I also have rum extract/butter rum extract/and rum emulsion I use in shakes, homemade keto pudding/ mixed into dishes. and even add some to drink to give it a rum flavor lol.

I can only think of two things, 1 something you put on your potato was contaminated like the butter container could have crumbs in it or something like that as mentioned before, and you could be having a reaction to dairy or what ever was put in it.......IF it was just plain potato and you reacted with bloating and cramping you might have a carb issues, tad rare and most associated with additional auto immune diseases but could be in which case a diet of fats and protein would be your answer much like it is for me now days. What all have you eaten in the privous 8 hours including beverages, condiments, spices and foods?

They are gluten-free. Did you use butter that might have gluten crumbs on it? For me , it takes more than 2 hours to feel the effect of gluten- maybe something you ate before? Maybe stomach virus?

Has anyone had an reaction to potatoes? Just made couple bake potatoes 2hrs ago and now I feel awful...just wondering thought potatoes were gluten free?????