24220 NY Giants Justin Pugh Says Gluten-Free Made Him Stronger - Celiac.com
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NY Giants Justin Pugh Says Gluten-Free Made Him Stronger

Celiac.com 01/15/2016 - In his three years with the NFL, New York Giants lineman, Justin Pugh has made himself a key part of his team's strong offense. At 6-foot-4 inches, 305-pounds, and with strength and speed to match, Pugh has wrecked havoc on opposing linemen.

Image: NY Giants Logo--Wikimedia CommonsPro Football Focus, which monitors NFL games, and assigns grades based on player performance, currently ranks Pugh as one of the league's top ten guards.

Now word is out that Pugh has switched to a gluten-free diet after being diagnosed with a gluten-sensitivity last year as part of routine blood tests conduct by Quest Diagnostics. Quest's blood tests showed that, while Pugh does not have full-blown celiac disease, he does have a sensitivity that could negatively impact his performance on the field.

Those results prompted Pugh to ditch the gluten, which, Pugh says, has paid huge dividends.

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The main benefit, according to Pugh, is that he was able to gain a few pounds while dramatically reducing his overall body fat, something many football players struggle to accomplish. Pugh says that eating gluten-free has also increased his energy levels, and improved his training and recovery ability.

For example, his weight lifting numbers has increased dramatically. He can now comfortably bench press 425 pounds, much better than his previous best.

According to Pugh, the gluten-free diet has been the key to training heavily and feeling great.

Do you or someone you know have gluten-sensitivity? Share your comments below.

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1 Response:

 
Ed Arnold
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Jan 2016 9:13:28 AM PDT
Not surprising. While in college in my late teens, I always felt I was weaker than most of the other guys on our crew squad. It wasn't till much later in life, after diagnosis, that I learned hypothyroidism and hypoproteinemia (from celiac gut damage) were responsible.




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Yes but...

I didn't read that far. Yikes... A hefty dose of perspective in that one. For anyone reading this is the post:

Hi! I'm new to the Celiac world. I have been gluten free for around seven months, but still seem to get glutened on a regular basis. I have been sick since January '16 and think that is when it triggered, but I didn't realize until October what it was. By that time I was pregnant with my little boy who is due in June. I also have an almost 4 year old daughter. I am really torn and wondering if I need to really be tested? I have very strong suspicions that I am a true celiac because my aunt has been diagnosed. Part of me says it doesn't matter, just live gluten free and assume you are, but the other part says I need to get tested so I know if my kids are at risk. So far my daughter is fine. She was grain free until after her first birthday, I plan on doing the same with my son. But I also don't want them to suffer the way I have. What would you do? The reason I don't want to get tested is I don't want to start eating it again and feel terrible while I have little kids, last year was so hard and I just want to get strong again. I also plan to bf for a few years and don't necessarily think it's a good idea to eat gluten while bf right? Thank you!

Welcome too! Sorry to hear you're suffering now. If you can nail the diet you should improve. You should also think about vitamin supplements. There's a good chance that you're suffering from one or more deficiencies as a result of the affects of celiac on your intestine's capacity to draw nutrients from your food. A good multi vitamin is a must, just make sure its gluten free and see if your doctor can refer you to a dietician as Lochella's has.

Oh I had heard his name and read some stuff about him but hadn't come across this video! Thanks!!