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NY Giants Justin Pugh Says Gluten-Free Made Him Stronger

Celiac.com 01/15/2016 - In his three years with the NFL, New York Giants lineman, Justin Pugh has made himself a key part of his team's strong offense. At 6-foot-4 inches, 305-pounds, and with strength and speed to match, Pugh has wrecked havoc on opposing linemen.

Image: NY Giants Logo--Wikimedia CommonsPro Football Focus, which monitors NFL games, and assigns grades based on player performance, currently ranks Pugh as one of the league's top ten guards.

Now word is out that Pugh has switched to a gluten-free diet after being diagnosed with a gluten-sensitivity last year as part of routine blood tests conduct by Quest Diagnostics. Quest's blood tests showed that, while Pugh does not have full-blown celiac disease, he does have a sensitivity that could negatively impact his performance on the field.

Those results prompted Pugh to ditch the gluten, which, Pugh says, has paid huge dividends.

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The main benefit, according to Pugh, is that he was able to gain a few pounds while dramatically reducing his overall body fat, something many football players struggle to accomplish. Pugh says that eating gluten-free has also increased his energy levels, and improved his training and recovery ability.

For example, his weight lifting numbers has increased dramatically. He can now comfortably bench press 425 pounds, much better than his previous best.

According to Pugh, the gluten-free diet has been the key to training heavily and feeling great.

Do you or someone you know have gluten-sensitivity? Share your comments below.

Read more at: stack.com

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1 Response:

 
Ed Arnold
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
15 Jan 2016 9:13:28 AM PDT
Not surprising. While in college in my late teens, I always felt I was weaker than most of the other guys on our crew squad. It wasn't till much later in life, after diagnosis, that I learned hypothyroidism and hypoproteinemia (from celiac gut damage) were responsible.




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