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New Belgium's Glütiny Ale Shows a New Way to Do "Gluten-free"

Celiac.com 04/22/2016 - To label a beer 'gluten-free' it must contain no gluten ingredients from start to finish. But, without wheat or barley, how does a brewer create the foundation for the beer?

Photo: New Belgium Brewing, Inc.One problem gluten-free beers have is that, because they are brewed without wheat and/or barley, they are technically not beers under German beer laws, whatever their legal status here. Another issue is that since purely gluten-free beers must be brewed with all gluten-free ingredients, they have been often regarded as lackluster in the taste department, especially by beer connoisseurs, gluten-free or not.

In an effort to provide a genuine, high quality beer for those suffering from celiac disease, and get beyond the taste limitations of totally gluten-free beers, a new generation of beer makers are using traditional ingredients and innovative methods of to remove up to 99.99 percent, or more, of the gluten molecules from the brew before bottling.

The result is a beer that tests under 20ppm gluten levels, and which tastes like a genuine traditionally brewed wheat- or barley-based beers.

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One of the latest and perhaps best of the gluten-reduced beers on the market is Glütiny Pale Ale from Colorado's New Belgium Brewery. It's sited beer, Glütiny Pale Ale, isn't bad either.

To make Glütiny, New Belgum uses a special enzyme during the brewing process that breaks down the gluten to well under the FDA standards for gluten-free products.

According to Tim Dohms, of Hopjacks Pizza Kitchen and Taproom, "where most American pale ale is more floral with muted citrus notes, Glütiny showcases a big, dynamic flavor profile."

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21 Responses:

 
m.e.
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Apr 2016 10:00:04 AM PDT
Not exactly a new process. I believe Omission has been doing this for quite a while now.

 
Scott
Rating: ratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
23 Apr 2016 9:11:33 AM PDT
It is ironic that celiac.com is promoting gluten-reduced beers since they are not recommended for those with celiac disease.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
25 Apr 2016 4:29:42 PM PDT
Celiac.com reports news related to celiac disease and the gluten-free diet...we are not promoting this any more than any other news that we report. We have no financial connection with this company, and all of our advertising is disclosed as advertising.

 
David
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
22 Jul 2016 4:30:41 PM PDT
Where can I buy this beer New Belgium Glütiny Pale Ale?

 
Jennifer Iscol
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
23 Apr 2016 10:26:50 AM PDT
Jefferson, thank you for your ongoing coverage of topics in celiac disease. Please consider correcting significant factual errors in this article that give the erroneous impression that gluten-reduced beer is accepted as safe for people with celiac disease to consume. Gluten-reduced beer manufactured like Glutiny Ale is not new; it has been on the market since 2012, when Omission was introduced by Craft Brew Alliance. The federal government does not allow gluten-reduced beer to be labeled gluten-free because the gluten content cannot be verified. The primary test brewers use to measure the gluten level, the R5 Competitive ELISA, is not scientifically validated for this type of use; it is defeated by the enzyme used to degrade the gluten. Further, results from mass spectrometry, another test cited by gluten-reduced beer manufacturers with respect to the gluten level of their products, are not considered useful or valid until they are published in a peer-reviewed journal. Brewers have had years to do so and the results have not been published. When brewers post the unvalidated test results on their websites, send them to journalists and print them on packaging, it creates confusion for consumers and the media. Please note that beers brewed with traditional ingredients like barley are not regulated by FDA, but by TTB, which harmonizes its gluten-free rule with FDA. In 2013 the FDA explicitly rejected Craft Brew Alliance's bid to change the gluten-free rule to accommodate its gluten-reduced product. The TTB subsequently also ruled that barley-based gluten-reduced beer cannot be labeled gluten-free. Scientists and doctors recommend that people with celiac disease avoid gluten-reduced beer until the gluten content can be determined. The position of the federal government and celiac experts is backed by rigorous science. True gluten-free beer made from gluten-free ingredients is still the safe choice for people with celiac disease.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
25 Apr 2016 4:26:47 PM PDT
You are mistaken Jennifer, the R5 Competitive ELISA is the standard for detecting hydrolyzed gluten. Further, mass spectrometry has been a gold standard in detecting and analyzing peptides for well over 50 years, and would be considered the gold standard in analyzing beers for specific peptides: "A mass spectrum is a plot of the ion signal as a function of the mass-to-charge ratio. These spectra are used to determine the elemental or isotopic signature of a sample, the masses of particles and of molecules, and to elucidate the chemical structures of molecules, such as peptides and other chemical compounds." Further, it is not up to beer manufacturers to validate mass spectrometry or other accepted scientific tests to prove their beer is gluten-free. They have used the proper tests, which are accepted by the scientific community, and those tests show that their beers are gluten-free.

 
Sarah
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
26 Apr 2016 6:28:11 PM PDT
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0056452

Might want to check this out

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
27 Apr 2016 1:00:07 PM PDT
Yes, this article indicates that Mass Spectrometry is indeed accurate at determining the peptide quantity of hordein and wheat in beers: "MS quantification is undertaken using peptides that are specific and unique, enabling the quantification of individual hordein isoforms."

 
Sarah
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
27 Apr 2016 10:24:10 PM PDT
Agreed. It also says that R5 Elisa is not as good as mass spec. It's a shame gluten removed beers don't use mass spec to check for gluten content. If they did we could determine if they were safe for us.

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
28 Apr 2016 2:43:48 PM PDT
Several, including Omission, have used mass spec to prove their beers are safe--yet there are still people and groups out there who continue to ignore these results and claim that even mass spec isn't reliable enough, and that these companies should somehow be responsible for funding studies to prove that mass spec works on their beers!

 
Sarah
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
28 Apr 2016 3:43:57 PM PDT
I had no idea omission also did mass spec! This is good news.
Some people don't trust science, which is sad.
Better living through chemistry!!!

 
Linda Ostrow
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
26 Apr 2016 12:04:36 PM PDT
A very complicated, technical post but helpful. Does anyone know if Budweiser's Redbridge is GF? I tried Glutiny and thought it was terrible. I must have forgotten what 'real' beer tastes like after all these years. Again, thanks for the post.

 
Frank
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said this on
26 Apr 2016 7:01:42 PM PDT
Redbridge is labeled as gluten free and is gluten free. From their website: "We select only the highest quality ingredients and take every measure to ensure the beer contains no wheat or barley. How is that possible? Simple. Redbridge is made from sorghum, a safe grain for those allergic to wheat or gluten, and no blending or mixing of the ingredients takes place in order to preserve its purity. We then apply the true art of brewing – from the brewhouse process through fermentation and aging – to give Redbridge its hand crafted quality and specialty beer taste."

 
admin
( Author)
said this on
27 Apr 2016 12:56:23 PM PDT
Yes, but it just isn't real beer according to the German Reineheitsgebot, and you can taste this.

 
Coloradosue
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said this on
25 Apr 2016 8:39:13 PM PDT
What about the other so-called gluten free beverages like gluten free hard ciders ie: apple, cherry, mango and the rest. I blame myself for this but I consumed 2 bottles of GF cider on Super Bowl 50. Within an hour I was vomiting copious amounts and missed the last 5 minutes of the game. The labels were double checked and they said gluten free. I am extremely allergic to gluten and take very great care on what I eat and drink. I have to wonder just how stringent testing is done on GF hard ciders. I have put hard on my do not consume list for now!!!!!

 
Robjg
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
26 Apr 2016 12:29:37 PM PDT
It would be a very poor cider brewer that added anything containing gluten to the brew. It's apples, yeast and maybe some sugar. It's more likely either:
A) tummy bug
B) something you ate.

 
Frank
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said this on
26 Apr 2016 7:02:52 PM PDT
I must agree

 
Donald
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfullratingfull Unrated
said this on
26 Apr 2016 1:19:07 AM PDT
If I was limited to beers brewed with non-gluten ingredients I would just quit beer altogether.

Omission, on the other hand, is as good as regular beer. I expect New Belgium Glutiny Pale Ale to be similar to Omission Pale Ale. I will be on the look out for it.

 
JazzyJake
Rating: ratingfullratingfullratingemptyratingemptyratingempty Unrated
said this on
26 Apr 2016 7:40:00 AM PDT
I won't drink the gluten reduced beers until a definitive source declares them safe. The sorghum based beers are uniformly awful! But... I recently found the beers made by Glutenberg and they are pretty good. They are made from millet, not sorghum, and taste very much like barley beers.

 
james
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said this on
26 Apr 2016 9:45:06 PM PDT
Why waste time on gluten free beer. For those willing to move on from celiac disease and get well...follow the rabbit hole. I did last week and I can't wait to feel good again.

 
JL Berry
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said this on
13 Mar 2017 7:17:36 AM PDT
I went out to a local bar this weekend sad that I couldn't drink beer due to my gluten sensitivity. I tried some wine and then was looking for something else to wet my whistle when the bartender said, we have A (meaning one) "gluten free beer." I tried it and he was like, "how is it?" I was trying to be polite but blurted out, "it's o.k. but it's not beer." It was a Daura. I was sad. I was really hoping for a nice gluten free beer experience. Before I quit gluten I was drinking Guiness and Sierra Nevada pale ale and other beers with quite a bit of taste. Last night at our local specialty market, Earthfare I spotted this "Glutiny" Pale Ale from New Belgium. I really love all of NB's other beers so I tried it out. It is amazingly wonderful and flavorful and rich and like drinking real beer. I read the label and was confused when it basically said, "we took out the gluten, but can't guarantee this is gluten free." This article and the subsequent comments really explains things and I'm happy to report that I drank this last night with my GF bun and mushroom Swiss burger and it felt like old times with yummy beer and burger combo, just GF too!




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