24682 Should Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Be Screened for Celiac Disease? - Celiac.com
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Should Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Disease Be Screened for Celiac Disease?

Should patients with autoimmune thyroid disease be screened for celiac disease?


Photo: CC--Normalityrelief

Celiac.com 02/13/2017 - Researchers have noted a strong clinical association between autoimmune thyroid disease and adult celiac disease. In part, at least, this appears to be related to common genetically-based determinants as well as a common embryonic origin since the fetal thyroid is derived from the pharyngeal gut.

Dr. Hugh J Freeman of the Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology, at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC, Canada recently set out to review evidence from earlier prevalence studies and recent population-based studies.

Specific phenotypic features have been described if both disorders are defined, including dermatitis herpetiformis, and a greater risk for a malignant complication, including lymphoma, especially if celiac disease is initially diagnosed at a late age. Some phenotypic characteristics of autoimmune thyroid disease, such as orbitopathy, may be an important clue to occult celiac disease.

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Similarly, patients requiring a high thyroxine dose to treat their autoimmune thyroid disease may reflect another aspect of undetected celiac disease.

In some studies, the relationship has also been extended to other phenotypic features, such as dermatitis herpetiformis, and a greater risk of malignant complication, especially if celiac disease is detected in late or elderly age groups. In addition, some phenotypic characteristics of thyroid disease, such as orbitopathy and a high dose requirement for replacement may be added clinical clues to occult or undetected celiac disease.

Dr. Freeman recommends that doctors consider serological screening for adult celiac disease in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

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Wish I could give you a hug. Unfortunately I know how that feels with Neurologists, Internists, Endocrinologists, Rheumatologists, GIs..... I got so tired of crying my drive home after refusing yet another script for Prozac. I do hope your GI can give you some answers even if it is just to rule out other possible issues. Keep on the gluten and we are here for you.

It is too bad that so often a full panel isn't done. Glad your appointment got moved up and hopefully you will get a clearer answer from the GI. Do keep eating gluten until the celiac testing is done. Once the testing is done do give the diet a good strict try. Hang in there.

That makes sense...I cried with relief when I got my diagnosis just because there was finally an answer. Please know that you are not weak or crazy. Keep pushing for testing. It could still be celiac, it could be Crohns. Push your Dr's to figure this out. Best wishes.

Thank you all very much. I actually cried when I got the answer. I wanted an explanation that I could "fix." Now I'm back to thinking I'm just weak and possibly crazy. I know I'm not crazy, but you know.

From what I have read online there is about a 1-3% chance of getting a false positive for celiac disease from a blood test. Was it a blood test that you got done? It may be worth your while to get a biopsy or more testing just to confirm it. I know being gluten free is a pain but it is better than getting cancer or other auto immune disorders.