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Infections in Early Life Associated with Increased Risk for Celiac Disease

Can early childhood infections lead to celiac disease?


Can early infections in infants lead to celiac disease? Photo: CC--CaptMikey

Celiac.com 07/21/2017 - In previous studies, a team of scientists led by Professor Anette-Gabriele Ziegler had already shown an association between infections in early childhood and the development of type 1 diabetes. In that study, the researchers saw the highest risk for type 1 diabetes in children who experienced repeated respiratory infections in the first six months of life.

Recently, Zeigler and another team of colleagues from the Institute for Diabetes Research at Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), set out to determine whether infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for celiac disease later on.

Their current study shows that the risk of developing celiac disease is particularly high when gastrointestinal tract infections occur during the first year of life.

To a lesser extent, an increased disease risk was also seen in connection with early respiratory tract infections. The risk seems to be particularly high for people who experience repeated gastrointestinal infections in the first year of life.

Whether the connections with early infections and later celiac risk are causal or are based on changes in the microbiome or specific immune responses is not clear from the data, said first author Dr. Andreas Beyerlein.

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"However," Beyerlein added, "it seems that the increased risk of celiac disease is associated with a permanent inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in early childhood and is not caused by a specific viral or bacterial pathogen."

The team reached their conclusion after analyzing fully anonymized data provided by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayern) of 295,420 children who were born between 2005 and 2007.

Medically attended infections from birth until a median age of 8.5 years were considered in the analysis. A total of 853 children developed gluten intolerance, equivalent to 0.3 percent.

Their results appear in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

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2 Responses:

 
Cataalcaja
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said this on
26 Jul 2017 8:29:16 AM PDT
I always wondered about putting infants on heavy antibiotics. They say infections, perhaps it what they use to treat the infection. My daughter aspirated and was put in the neonatal unit for pneumonia. She was put on antibiotics for a week. She always had stomach issues but no body addressed celiacs 16 years ago. Often I have wondered about the effects these meds would have. She is now 19 and highly sensitive and gets ill very easily. Has anyone studied the effects of the antibiotics?

 
Deb Fuller
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said this on
28 Jul 2017 6:21:51 AM PDT
I was fine until I contracted West Nile Meningitis in 2012. From then on things went downhill. I have even heard of a pregnancy resulting in celiac disease. It´s my unprofessional opinion that when the immune system is compromised other complications can occur.




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Then she has already been diagnosed. Dh equals celiac, although I never heard of a MILD case. It's usually quite extraordinarily disturbing.

I would stick to a very basic gluten-free diet as recommended by Dr. Fasano and other celiac experts. It would not hurt for a short amount of time and might get him through his exams. This is the study about dealing with Trace Amounts of Hidden Gluten (not saying your son has non-responsi...

Yes do follow up with testing, once confirmed we can help you along the road. Other intolerance and allergies are very common with this disease. Lactose is broken down by enzymes produced by the tips of your villi in your intestines, they are normally the most damaged and in some cases just gone....

Please follow the advice of celiac experts and get your daughter tested before going gluten free, Your doctor, like many, is woefully misinformed. You should be tested too (all first degree relatives), even if symptom free, and especially since your mother was recently diagnosed. Learn more a...

We in the UK he takes a pack lunch and have asked for a health plan so wait and see. Not easy when he taking his gcse and he wants to do well. Thanks for the advice