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Gluten-Free Food Now Mainstream

Gluten-free food is now a mainstream commercial product.


Gluten-free foods are now mainstream store products. Photo: CC: Bruce Szalwinski.jpg

Celiac.com 09/06/2017 - Gluten-free food is now so mainstream that its lack of gluten is no longer a highlight, but is now just another of the many ways manufacturers signal a healthy product.

Gluten-free has gone from specialty niche to mainstream, says David Sprinkle, research director of the market research firm Packaged Facts.

"Where once upon a time a package might have had a singular fat-free or no-sugar-added label, it is now common to see packages that carry a host of tags such as certified organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, no antibiotics ever, no artificial preservatives, cage-free and more," says Sprinkle. Gluten-free tag is now just one of many "free-from" tags that help to lure consumers.

That sentiment is shared by Kara Nielsen, sales and engagement manager at U.S.A., for Dutch company Innova Market Insights. Nielson says that Innova's data from "both global product launches and consumer surveys show that gluten-free is not going away, but rather found a place in the mainstream."

So a market once dedicated to people with medical issues has now become a market for consumers who see avoiding gluten as a lifestyle choice.

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As that has happened, gluten-free has become part of that mix instead of being a focal point. This has in turn driven an evolution towards more healthy ingredients, and healthier overall profiles for many gluten-free foods.

"The gluten-free trend is evolving in bakery products to feature more high-fiber and high-protein ancient grains and seeds, including buckwheat, teff and chia seeds, as well as gluten-free oats," Ms. Nielsen said.

For consumers who have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, this can require more diligence in their shopping. They can't necessarily trust a gluten-free label without proper scrutiny. There are more than a few tricky labels out there. Some products that appear to be gluten-free may not meet FDA standards.

The upside is a flood of new gluten-free products that are not only safe for people with celiac disease, but markedly healthier than gluten-free products of the past.

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Interesting article. I do wonder how she was 'misdiagnosed' though and how she came to the conclusion she wasn't celiac.

Try dropping the oats for while and see if that helps. Some of us, myself included, react to even the ones that are certified as gluten free.

Hey guys, I appreciate the input, you are all very sweet and kind. I do not eat out at all. Only eat food I cook. No alcohol. Only certified gluten-free oats, grains, rice, etc. I have 3 roommates in a little house. I have my own gluten-free section to cook and prepare foo...

What was your gluten free diet like? I wonder if, when you were gluten-free, you went more whole food, less processed food? Or did you continue to eat processed food that was just gluten free? One reason I ask is that I have cut way back on grains and processed foods like gluten-free bread, but o...

Equal parts Hershey Coco Powder and a sweetener with a pinch of salt. Super easy to make your own. I like adding a bit to my coffee with almond milk, and lakanto sugar free maple, or a bit of monk fruit or stevia. PS you might want to drop dairy milk. The enzymes to break it down come from th...