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DonnaD

Does Anyone Else Get Really Cold Feet And Hands?

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How low was your Vitamin B12 ? What is it caused by ? If you have peripheral neuropathy caused by low B12 - oral supps probably are not for you. It means you may have a more severe B12 deficiency caused by Pernicious Anaemia or Gastritis or malabsorption and you need B12 shots for that. PN Can start when your B12 drops below 350. I have PA - an autoimmune disease which means I lack Intrinsic Factor in my stomach to absorb B12 from my food. An oral supp would do nothing for me. I need shots every 3 weeks. Due for one now - can feel feet tingles coming back - and that is 18 days since my last injection.

I don't know about the other person, but I haven't had the shooting pains for long. They started in January at the same time I got super sick with celiac-like symptoms for the first time. The pains went away when I went gluten-free. I've been sick twice since then (gluten exposure, I'm sure), and the most recent time my pains reappeared. I'm recovering, but I still have a tad bit of pain here and there and some tingling.

I have a phobia of needles.

Question: Are you familiar with the term "geographic tongue?" I had one for years. It's where your taste buds flatten out in certain places, making your tongue look like a map. My taste buds all grew in when I went gluten-free! Then, when I got sick again, my geographic tongue came back - I lost taste buds again. And now that I'm getting better, my taste buds are back AGAIN !!!!! People seem to be divided on what a geographic tongue is caused by. I saw at least one reference to b12 deficiency as a suggested cause. Some people don't think it signifies anything and is just hereditary.

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Guest BornToRide

Cold hands and feet and the ability to stay warm are usually typical low thyroid problems. Many doctors fail to check comprehensively enough and often miss Hashimoto's thyroditis, a condition often linked to gluten intolerance, perhaps a condition even created by gluten intolerance. They need to run a test that checks for thyroid antibodies, otherwise they miss it. You can have so called "normal" hormone levels and still have symtoms. If your thyroid antibodies are high and you have symptoms, you should be treated regardless.

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