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kolka

Rising Question

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Upon the suggestion of someone named Guliah, I tried the Kinnikinnik mix [2 parts rice, 2 parts potato starch, 1 part tapioca] to convert a bagel recipe. It is an Emeril recipe. I actually modified the kinnikinnik mix to 1 part rice, 1 part sweet rice . . . because I did this last week and made danish and they were outstanding. I used a Julia Child danish recipe and converted it with this mix. The danish came out tender, flaky, great.

The bagels ultametely came out well, a little too crunchy on the outside, but very good toasted. Question: I've noticed gluten-free bread recipes use egg beaters because the dough is more like batter and also there is only one rise. For gluten bread, you mix, let rise, punch down, let rise AGAIN and then bake. This is what I did for the Emeril recipe. I mixed, let rise, shaped the bagels, let rise, boiled and then baked. Should I have mixed, shaped, let rise and then baked? Or should I mix, let rise, shape and bake? I liked this kinnikinnik mix because it seemed to work more like regular flour. The end result is pretty good, too. But what about the rising? This is the original recipe:

2 cups warm water, about 110 degrees F

2 (1/4-ounce) packets active dry yeast

3 tablespoons granulated sugar, plus 1 tablespoon

5 to 6 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons vegetable oil

2 tablespoons yellow cornmeal

Optional Toppings:

1/2 cup lightly toasted chopped onions (2 teaspoons each)

2 tablespoons poppy seeds (about 1/2 teaspoon each)

2 tablespoons sesame seeds (about 1/2 teaspoon each)

1 tablespoon kosher salt (about 1/4 teaspoon each)

Combine the water, yeast, and 3 tablespoons of the sugar in the bowl of an upright mixer fitted with a dough hook. Stir and let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Gradually add 4 cups of the flour and the salt, and mix until the mixture comes together.

Add 1 to 1 1/2 cups additional flour 1/2 cup at a time to make a stiff dough, either stirring with the wooden spoon or working with your hands. Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and no longer sticky, about 5 minutes, adding just as much flour as needed. (Dough should be heavier and stiffer than regular yeast bread dough.)

Grease a large bowl with 1 teaspoon of the oil. Place the dough in the bowl, turning to coat. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free spot until almost doubled, about 1 hour.

Remove from the bowl and punch down the dough. Divide into 12 equal pieces, about 2 to 3 ounces each, measuring about 4 inches across. Form each piece of dough into a ball. Roll each ball into a 4 to 6-inch log. Join the ends and place fingers through the hole and roll the ends together. Repeat with the remaining dough. Place on a lightly greased surface, cover with a clean cloth, and let rest until risen but not doubled in a draft-free spot, 20 to 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Grease a baking sheet with the remaining teaspoon of oil

In a large, heavy pot, bring 12 cups of water and the remaining tablespoon of sugar to a boil. In batches, add the bagels to the water and boil, turning, for 30 seconds to 1 minute. Flip bagels onto the prepared sheet pan. Bake for 5 minutes, turn over and cook for another 30 to 35 minutes.

Remove from the oven and let cool on a wire rack.


DD: gluten-free/casein-free, soy lite, corn lite

Me: Vegan

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I mixed, let rise, shaped the bagels, let rise, boiled and then baked. Should I have mixed, shaped, let rise and then baked? Or should I mix, let rise, shape and bake? I liked this kinnikinnik mix because it seemed to work more like regular flour. The end result is pretty good, too. But what about the rising?

It really doesn't appear to matter in my ktichen, lol. I sometimes do bread just like I used to. Sometimes I don't. What I seem to notice is that I have a slightly "finer" texture from the double rise. But, it probably doesn't make enough of a difference to bother.

I'd do whatever is easiest. I would think mix, shape, rise would be the easiest and best - but that's just a guess (sometimes what seems logical is not what turns out to be my favorite way). You do need some rise time, unless you're using a TON of yeast. We don't get too much oven-spring (at least I don't) if I have a full rise, but I don't get enough oven-spring alone without any rise. So, maybe a 20-30 minute rise and you'd be good to go.

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