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chb

All Of My Results..blood Test, Scope, And Enterolab. Your Thoughts Please.

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Hi all,

I have mostly been plauged by fatigue, infertility, and neurological symptoms. Came across info in the spring that it might be the gluten. I felt so good after a small gluten free trial I went back on it to have the tests done.

My blood tests came back negative for everything, except I had an elevated antigliadin IGA. My endoscope biopsies came back clear. My doctor pretty much said you don't have celiac, but if eating gluten free makes you feel better, it won't hurt you to try it.

Wanting to nail down exactly what was going on with me, I went ahead and ordered the tests from Enterolab. The following are my results:

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 45 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 84 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 283 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 26 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0202

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe.

So, I feel really good that this verifies what my body is telling me when I eat Gluten free. I have been gluten-free for a little over a month, except for a few mishaps, that immeadiatley brought on the visual disturbances and migraines. I have two questions though that I would love to hear advice about:

I am shocked my casein came back elevated. Could it be resonsible for neurological problems or does it only manifest itself in GI problems? I don't have a problem following the gluten-free diet, but the thought of eliminating any milk products really is a tough blow.

Since my Transglutaminase is elevated showing an autimmune reaction, does that mean it is Celiac or just as my gene test shows a sensitivity to the gluten? Does a gluten sensitivity lead to an autoimmune reaction? Just kind of wondering how I label myself.

Thanks so much for offering up any thought on how you understand my values. I'll be e-mailing my doc tomorrow to see what reply she might have to the tests she did vesus what Enterolab came up with.


Christine

gluten-free since April 2008

Dairy Free June 2008

Blood tests normal except elevated anigliadin IgA

Endoscope negative

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 45 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 84 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 283 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 26 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

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Just kind of wondering how I label myself.

Healthy -when you choose what goes into your body, rather than eating what others think you should.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

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hi,

although your two genes ALONE are gluten intolerant genes TOGETHER they may make the complete celiac gene.

The reason is DQ2subtype 2(also known as DQ2.2) is half the full DQ2.5 celiac gene. Some of the DQ7(also known as DQ3 subtype 7) genes are the other half of the full DQ2.5 celiac gene. So when DQ2.2 and the right DQ7 gene come together they make the full DQ2.5 gene.

Enterolab does not tell you that. They do not test the alpha part of the gene but only the beta part. DQ2.2 has the right beta part, but not the alpha part. The alpha part of the correct DQ7 gene is where the half of the celiac gene is. So from this gene test there is no way to know if you have the whole celiac gene are not. YOu may though. There are other gene tests available that do test for the alpha part also.

Either way, DQ2.2 is definately a gluten intolerant gene. If you feel better without gluten, I would not eat it.

I have the DQ2.2 gene also but without the DQ7.


gluten . . . Kiss my grits!

pork and beef free- 1994

wheat free or wheat light- 2003

gluten free- January 2008

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I am shocked my casein came back elevated. Could it be resonsible for neurological problems or does it only manifest itself in GI problems? I don't have a problem following the gluten-free diet, but the thought of eliminating any milk products really is a tough blow.

I think that anytime the body is raising up antibodies against invaders, many different body systems can be affected depending on a person's genetic weaknesses. You probably, like most of us, have a "leaky gut" so molecules that shouldn't, are getting into the bloodstream and then traveling right up to the brain, where there is also probably a leaky barrier (look up threads on zonulin/leaky gut)---leading to neurological issues and /or behavioral issues, moodiness etc. Everyone is different though. My daughter and I both had similar results to yours, only I am celiac and she is gluten sensitive. She also had antibodies to soy and eggs, I didnt' pay for that test for myself. Again though, this is due to the leaky gut...heal that and there's hope I think for those without celiac genes to perhaps eat some of those offending foods again. We've been gluten and dairy free (and 98% soy free) for the past 7 months. It sounds hard, but i'd suggest doing 3 weeks of total dairy free, then try some dairy. If you're like me, i'd have one of several reactions: either i'd have to conk out on the couch for literally two hours, or i'd get a major headache, joint pains (that how can I walk in the morning, feeling like 70 years old), and/or digestive issues. Once you feel the reaction, makes it easier to avoid next time...now I really don't miss it much (only when i'm out in restaurants around other people indulging...so I don't do that too often!)

Another reason casein is often a problem for gluten sensitive people (and soy too) is because the protein structures themselves are apparently very similar so it's harder for the body to differentiate between them.

So, yup, you should eliminate the dairy, and soy as well for now :) But you'll feel better so it will be worth it. My daughter and I console ourselves with the thought of how we're going to eat anything we want in heaven one day :) LOL, it really does help!

good luck and hang in there,


Liz

Positive enterolab results 11/07:

-antigliadin IgA: 56 (normal <10)

-antitissue tTG IgA: 39 (normal <10)

-anti-casein IgA: 34 (normal <10)

-HLA-DQ: 2,1 (2,6)

Positive blood test IgA and IgG 12/07

Gluten-free Casein-free since 12/07

mostly soy free since 12/07

Diagnosed with adrenal fatigue 08/07

Diagnosed hypothyroid 01/08

Still have mercury fillings, high mercury and lead

Multiple chemical sensitivities

9 year old daughter positive enterolab test for gluten, casein, soy and egg with HLA-DQ 3,1 (7,6)--mostly exhibits behavioral reactions to foods including food dyes, MSG, aspartame

Mother passed away 3 years ago of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary. Two years prior had diarrhea causing her to weigh 86 pounds...Mayo clinic told her to take pepto bismol. NO test for celiac, lifelong hx of ulcers, osteoporosis. I now know she had the celiac gene (my dad has DQ1) and was probably undiagnosed her whole life.

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I just wanted to second the suggestion of eliminating casein as well. Sorry. ;) You might find out that it really affects your fatigue and neurological symptoms. At least try dairy free for a while.

For the definition... you might be in the early stages of celiac where enough damage hasn't developed yet to get a positive biopsy, or you might have a form of celiac that affects the nervous system more than it affects the intestine. Or you might be gluten intolerant. I don't know that there really is a way to know, there's still a lot that isn't known about celiac. Bottom line though is if it works, keep gluten free. :)

Pauliina

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So, yup, you should eliminate the dairy, and soy as well for now :) But you'll feel better so it will be worth it. My daughter and I console ourselves with the thought of how we're going to eat anything we want in heaven one day :) LOL, it really does help!

THANK YOU everyone who has replied so far. Your answers are helpful to my scattered brain. And Lizz, especially thank you for that thought. I'm sitting here trying to muster up energy to go do music at VBS this morning and that really helped! :D


Christine

gluten-free since April 2008

Dairy Free June 2008

Blood tests normal except elevated anigliadin IgA

Endoscope negative

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 45 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 84 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 283 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 26 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

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