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I don't know the answer, but see psawyer's response in this thread from earlier this year:

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?s...mp;#entry418837

and debmidge's answer from an older post:

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=4296

and here: http://www.celiac.ca/EnglishCCA/egfdiet2.html

So yes- there is conflicting info out there, but may be safe. What company makes the product that has maltose in it?

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I have two published (printed) sources that state that maltose is gluten-free. They are:

Gluten-Free Diet, A Comprehensive Resource Guide, Expanded Edition by Shelley Case, BSc, RD, ISBN 1-897010-28-1.

Acceptability of Foods and Food Ingredients for the Gluten-Free Diet, Pocket Dictionary published by the Canadian Celiac Association, ISBN 0-921026-21-8.

I personally don't put much faith in the CSA (Celiac Sprue Association) as a source of accurate information. Much of their "information" has been shown to be erroneous, or is based on outdated ideas that have since been disproved.

As far as I am concerned, maltose is safe.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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I have two published (printed) sources that state that maltose is gluten-free. They are:

Gluten-Free Diet, A Comprehensive Resource Guide, Expanded Edition by Shelley Case, BSc, RD, ISBN 1-897010-28-1.

Acceptability of Foods and Food Ingredients for the Gluten-Free Diet, Pocket Dictionary published by the Canadian Celiac Association, ISBN 0-921026-21-8.

I personally don't put much faith in the CSA (Celiac Sprue Association) as a source of accurate information. Much of their "information" has been shown to be erroneous, or is based on outdated ideas that have since been disproved.

As far as I am concerned, maltose is safe.

You really think it's safe? I'm so tired of being freaked out by every little thing I put in my body and every label I read. I know about the obvious, but this is ridiculous. I know, I know, it's my health. But I'm tired of stressing about everything when it comes to food. That certainly isn't helping my health any.

I found the maltose in VSL#3 probiotic powder.

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You really think it's safe?

Yes, I really do.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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You really think it's safe? I'm so tired of being freaked out by every little thing I put in my body and every label I read. I know about the obvious, but this is ridiculous. I know, I know, it's my health. But I'm tired of stressing about everything when it comes to food. That certainly isn't helping my health any.

I found the maltose in VSL#3 probiotic powder.

I'm so glad I found this thread. I too, am so freaked out by the things that my boyfriend eats (he's the one with celiac), he on the other hand is more nonchalent. Maltose is also found in alot of Asian pastries too.

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