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Type One Diabetic For 18 Years, Related To Celiac?
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hi, I've been a diabetic for 18 years, and just recently, my doctor told me my stomach problems, (extreme bloating, irregular bowel movements and others) are most likely being caused by celiac disease, but no formal tests were done. I've been advised to drop gluten, and since doing so, some of my stomach problems have gotten less problematic. I'm just wondering if its common to have celiac and type 1 diabetes together, and if so, is anyone able to throw some ideas how i can still eat with a diet plan suited for both? thanks for any help i can get, i may be small but my appetite, not so much

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Type 1 diabetics are one of the groups that are supposed to be screened for celiac as they are a group that has a higher rate of the disease. Your doctor really should have done a blood test before you started the diet. You may want to see if you can get a referral to a dietian knowledgable about both to give you a bit of help with it. We do have some type 1 folks here who hopefully will chime in and give you a bit of guidance. The way you should eat is basically the same as you are for the diabetes but without gluten containing foods.

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Yes, there is a connection between diabetes and celiac. Celiac is associated with many autoimmune diseases.

I have been trying to convince my sister to be tested as she has both type 1 diabetes and is hypothyroid, but she won't do it. :(

I applaud your doctor for making the connection between diabetes and celiac, but agree with Ravenwood that you should have been tested first before going gluten free. Wonder why he did not do that?

Glad you are noticing an improvement in your gastro symptoms!

I found this article for my sister, but maybe you might like to read it?

http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/clinical/departments/medicine/divisions/digestive-health/nutrition-support-team/copy_of_nutritionarticles/KupperArticle.pdf

There are many people on here with diabetes who can be more helpful to you. Best wishes!

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There are a couple diabetics who hang out here and I hope they'll give you some personal advice. But from what I've read, the problem with combining a gluten-free diet and a diabetic diet is that most gluten-free replacement foods don't have much fiber and have a lot of simple sugars which mess up blood sugar. I think it will be important to eat lots of protein, veggies, dairy and fiber more brown rice, quinoa and buckwheat and less gluten-free pastries, bagels.

Counsulting a dietician (should be covered by insurance but worth it if not) would be really helpful, IMO. Good luck!

(P.S. I'm one of those people who think that wheat may trigger diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. Interesting to see if they ever find out what causes diabetes.)

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(P.S. I'm one of those people who think that wheat may trigger diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. Interesting to see if they ever find out what causes diabetes.)

I have long pondered the relationship between celiac and other autoimmune diseases. I've been a type one diabetic for thirty-eight years, and an undiagnosed celiac until five years ago. SOMETHING caused my autoimmune system, all those years ago, to send out antibodies that ended up killing off my islets of Langerhans. I know that gluten causes an autoimmune reaction within my body... . . . ..so it makes great logical sense to believe that gluten caused the destruction of my insulin-producing beta cells. Couple that with the latest data claiming that one in eight type ones are celiac (the number is likely higher, as SO many people with gluten issues are undiagnosed) and the idea of celiac/gluten intolerance "causing" diabetes becomes quite compelling.

I find the gluten-free diet a valuable tool in keeping my blood sugars in tight control. Carbohydrates cause blood sugar to rise, particularly refined carbs. Once I eliminated gluten, I inadvertently got rid of almost all the refined, processed foodstuffs in my diet. My blood sugar has always been well-controlled, but once I started the gluten-free diet, things got even better. It really was a blessing in many ways, this diagnosis. . . . .. ...just gotta keep reminding my self of this every now and then! :)

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